Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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of this month Joseph came to the conclusion to remove him self and as well as their families, to the before men tioned town of in order to expedite the work. They  moved to the house of father , and lived with  him in peace until the 25th of March; when a circums ance occured which I shall relate in his own words:—
“On the 25th of March, the twins before mentioned  which had been sick of the measles for some time, cau sed us to be broke of our rest in taking care of them, esp ecially my . In the evening I told her she had  better retire to rest with one of the children, and I would  watch with the sickest child. In the night she told  me I had better lay <lie> down on the trundle bed, and  I did so, and was soon after awoke by her screaming,  Murder! when I found myself going out of the door,  in the [hands] of about a dozen men; some of whose hands were  in my hair, and some hold of my shirt, drawers, and lim bs. The foot of the trundle bed was towards the door,  leaving only room enough for the door to swing. My   heard a gentle tapping on the windows which  she then took no particular notice of, (but which was  unquestionably designed for ascertaining whether we were  all asleep) and soon after the mob burst open the door  and surrounded the bed in an instant, and, as I said the  first I knew I was going out of the door in the hands  of an infuriated mob. I made a desperate struggle,  as I was forced out to extricate myself but only cleared  one leg with which I made a pass at one man, and  he fell on the door steps. I was immediately confined  again; and they swore by God, they would kill me if  I did not be still, which quieted me. As they passed  around the house with me, the fellow that I kicked  came to me and thrust his hand into my face all cov [p. 215]
of this month Joseph came to the conclusion to remove himself and as well as their families, to the before mentioned town of in order to expedite the work. They moved to the house of father , and lived with him in peace until the 25th of March; when a circumsance occured which I shall relate in his own words:—
“On the 25th of March, the twins before mentioned which had been sick of the measles for some time, caused us to be broke of our rest in taking care of them, especially my . In the evening I told her she had better retire to rest with one of the children, and I would watch with the sickest child. In the night she told me I had better lie down on the trundle bed, and I did so, and was soon after awoke by her screaming, Murder! when I found myself going out of the door, in the [hands] of about a dozen men; some of whose hands were in my hair, and some hold of my shirt, drawers, and limbs. The foot of the trundle bed was towards the door, leaving only room enough for the door to swing. My heard a gentle tapping on the windows which she then took no particular notice of, (but which was unquestionably designed for ascertaining whether we were all asleep) and soon after the mob burst open the door and surrounded the bed in an instant, and, as I said the first I knew I was going out of the door in the hands of an infuriated mob. I made a desperate struggle, as I was forced out to extricate myself but only cleared one leg with which I made a pass at one man, and he fell on the door steps. I was immediately confined again; and they swore by God, they would kill me if I did not be still, which quieted me. As they passed around the house with me, the fellow that I kicked came to me and thrust his hand into my face all cov [p. 215]
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