Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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that the reason was, that he () was too merciful unto the  Mormons, and would not let him have the command,  but had given it to , who was from ,  and whose heart had become hardened by his former acts of bloo dshed <rapine> and bloodshed, he being one of the leaders in murdering,  driving, plundering, and burning Some 2 or 3 hundred houses  belonging to the Mormon people in that in the years  1833 and 1834.
requested to spare the people  and not suffer them to be massacred until the next morn ing, it then being evening. He Coolly agreed that he would not,  and also said, that, he had not as yet recived the ’s order,  but he expected it every hour, and should not make any further  move until he had received it; but he would not make any pro mises so far as regarded ’s army (he having <arrived> a few  minutes previously and joined the main body of the army; he, kn owing well at what hour to form a junction with the main body  body.) then returned to the , giving this informa tion.— The immediately despatched a second messenger wi th a white flag, to request another interview with , in order to touch his sympathies and compassion, and if  it were possible, for him to use his influence best endeavors to pr eserve the lives of the people. On the return of the messenger, we  we learned that several persons had been killed by some of the  soldiers who were under the command of . One Mr.  Carey had his brains knocked out by the britch of a gun, and  he lay bleeding several hours; but his family were not permitt ed to approach him, nor any one else allowed to administer re lief to him whilst he lay upon the ground in the agonies of death.  Mr Carey had just arrived from in the Country from the state  of , only a few hours previous to the arrival of the army. He  had a family consisting of a wife and several small children . He was buried by Lucius <N> Scoville [Scovil], who is now the senior Ward [p. 261]
that the reason was, that he () was too merciful unto the Mormons, and would not let him have the command, but had given it to , who was from , and whose heart had become hardened by his former acts of rapine and bloodshed, he being one of the leaders in murdering, driving, plundering, and burning Some 2 or 3 hundred houses belonging to the Mormon people in that in the years 1833 and 1834.
requested to spare the people and not suffer them to be massacred until the next morning, it then being evening. He Coolly agreed that he would not, and also said, that, he had not as yet recived the ’s order, but he expected it every hour, and should not make any further move until he had received it; but he would not make any promises so far as regarded ’s army (he having arrived a few minutes previously and joined the main body of the army; he, knowing well at what hour to form a junction with the main body.) then returned to the , giving this information.— The immediately despatched a second messenger with a white flag, to request another interview with , in order to touch his sympathies and compassion, and if it were possible, for him to use his best endeavors to preserve the lives of the people. On the return of the messenger, we learned that several persons had been killed by some of the soldiers who were under the command of . One Mr. Carey had his brains knocked out by the britch of a gun, and he lay bleeding several hours; but his family were not permitted to approach him, nor any one else allowed to administer relief to him whilst he lay upon the ground in the agonies of death. Mr Carey had just arrived in the Country from the state of , only a few hours previous to the arrival of the army. He had a family consisting of a wife and several small children. He was buried by Lucius N Scoville Scovil, who is now the senior Ward [p. 261]
Page 261