History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 668
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you may say or ask why I have not remembered the good that you <​December 18 ’s Letter continued​> have done to me: When I reflect upon the injury I have done you, I must confess that I do not know what I have been about. I feel sorry for what I have done and humbly ask your forgiveness. I have not confidence as yet to come and see you, for I feel ashamed of what I have done, and as I feel now, I feel as though all the confessions that I could make verbally or by writing, would not be sufficient to atone for the transgressions. Be this as it may, I am willing to make all the restitution you shall require. If I can stay in the church as a member, I will try to make all the satisfaction possible. Yours with Respect. .
Do not cast me off for what I have done, but strive to save me in the church as a member. I do repent of what I have done to you and ask your forgiveness. I consider the transgression the other evening [HC 2:339] of no small magnitude, but it is done and I cannot help it now. I know, brother Joseph, you are always willing to forgive: but I sometimes think, when I reflect upon the many injuries I have done you, I feel as though a confession was hardly sufficient, but, have mercy on me this once, and I will try to do so no more. The Twelve called a Council yesterday, and sent over after me, and I went over. This council remember was called together by themselves, and not by me. .”
To the foregoing I gave the following answer the same day.
<​Joseph’s Letter to ​> , Having received your letter. I now proceed to answer it, and shall first proceed to give a brief narration of my feelings and motives since the night I first came to the knowledge of your having a debating school, which was at the time I happened in with , his Father and mother &c. and from that time I took an interest in them, and was delighted with it, and formed a determination to attend the school for the purpose of obtaining information, and with the Idea of imparting the same, through the assistance of the Spirit of the Lord, if by any means I should have faith to do so. and with this intent, I went to the school on last wednesday night, not with the idea of breaking up the school, neither did it enter into my heart, that there was any wrangling or jealousies in your heart, against me. Notwithstanding, previous to my leaving home, there were feelings of solemnity rolling across my breast, which were unaccountable to me, and also these feelings continued by spells to depress my spirits, and seemed to manifest that all was not right, even after the school commenced, and during the debate; yet I strove to believe that all would work together for good; I was pleased with the power of the arguments that were used, and did not feel to cast any reflections, upon any one that had spoken; but I felt that it was the duty of old men, that set as presidents, to be as grave, at least, as young men, [p. 668]
you may say or ask why I have not remembered the good that you December 18 ’s Letter continued have done to me: When I reflect upon the injury I have done you, I must confess that I do not know what I have been about. I feel sorry for what I have done and humbly ask your forgiveness. I have not confidence as yet to come and see you, for I feel ashamed of what I have done, and as I feel now, I feel as though all the confessions that I could make verbally or by writing, would not be sufficient to atone for the transgression. Be this as it may, I am willing to make all the restitution you shall require. If I can stay in the church as a member, I will try to make all the satisfaction possible. Yours with Respect. .
Do not cast me off for what I have done, but strive to save me in the church as a member. I do repent of what I have done to you and ask your forgiveness. I consider the transgression the other evening [HC 2:339] of no small magnitude, but it is done and I cannot help it now. I know, brother Joseph, you are always willing to forgive: but I sometimes think, when I reflect upon the many injuries I have done you, I feel as though a confession was hardly sufficient, but, have mercy on me this once, and I will try to do so no more. The Twelve called a Council yesterday, and sent over after me, and I went over. This council remember was called together by themselves, and not by me. .”
To the foregoing I gave the following answer the same day.
Joseph’s Letter to , Having received your letter. I now proceed to answer it, and shall first proceed to give a brief narration of my feelings and motives since the night I first came to the knowledge of your having a debating school, which was at the time I happened in with , his Father and mother &c. and from that time I took an interest in them, and was delighted with it, and formed a determination to attend the school for the purpose of obtaining information, and with the Idea of imparting the same, through the assistance of the Spirit of the Lord, if by any means I should have faith to do so. and with this intent, I went to the school on last wednesday night, not with the idea of breaking up the school, neither did it enter into my heart, that there was any wrangling or jealousies in your heart, against me. Notwithstanding, previous to my leaving home, there were feelings of solemnity rolling across my breast, which were unaccountable to me, and also these feelings continued by spells to depress my spirits, and seemed to manifest that all was not right, even after the school commenced, and during the debate; yet I strove to believe that all would work together for good; I was pleased with the power of the arguments that were used, and did not feel to cast any reflections, upon any one that had spoken; but I felt that it was the duty of old men, that set as presidents, to be as grave, at least, as young men, [p. 668]
Page 668