History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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firmly beleive, that an immediate civil war is the inevitable consequence. We know that there is not one among us <​June 29. Report. continued.​> who thirsts for the blood of that people. We do not contend that we have the least right, under the constitution and laws of the country, to expel them by force. But we would indeed be blind, if we did not foresee that the first blow, that is struck at this moment of deep excitement, must and will speedily involve every individual in a war bearing ruin, wo, and desolation in its course. It matters but little how, where or by whom the war may commence, begin, when the work of destruction commences, we must all be borne on word by the storm, or crushed beneath its furry. In a civil war, when our homes are <​is​> the the theatre, on which it is fought, there can be no neutrals; let our opinions be what they may, we must fight in self defence. We want nothing, we ask nothing, we would have nothing from this people. We only ask them for their own safety, and for ours, to take the least of the two evils. Most of them are destitutee of land, have but little property, are late emigrants to this country, without relations, friends, or enduring ties, to bind them to this land at the risque of such imminent peril to them and to us. We request them to leave us, when their crops are gathered, their business settled, and they have made every suitable preparation to remove. Those who have forty acres of land, we are willing, shall remain, until they can dispose of it without loss, if it should require years. But we urge, most strongly urge, that emigration cease and cease immediately, as nothing else can or will allay for a moment, the deep excitement that is now unhapily agitating this community. If the Mormons will comply with these friendly requisitions, we will use every ex[er]tion, among our own citizens, to arrest this evil before it is forever too late; but if they are disregarded, we can promise neither them or ourselves, a long continuation of the blessings of peace and harmony.
<​Resolutions​> 1st. Therefore, be it resolved by this meeting, that they view, with feelings of the deepest regret, the present unhappy situation of our country. [HC 2:451]
2nd. That it is the fixed and settled conviction of this meeting, that unless the people commonly called Mormons, will agree to stop immediately the emigration of their people to this , and take measures to remove themselves from it, a civil war is inevitable.
3d. That a committee of ten be appointed to make known to the leaders of that people. the views of this meeting, and to urge upon them the propriety, of acceeding to these propositions. [p. 738]
firmly beleive, that an immediate civil war is the inevitable consequence. We know that there is not one among us June 29. Report. continued. who thirsts for the blood of that people. We do not contend that we have the least right, under the constitution and laws of the country, to expel them by force. But we would indeed be blind, if we did not foresee that the first blow, that is struck at this moment of deep excitement, must and will speedily involve every individual in a war bearing ruin, wo, and desolation in its course. It matters but little how, where or by whom the war may , begin, when the work of destruction commences, we must all be borne on word by the storm, or crushed beneath its furry. In a civil war, when our homes is the the theatre, on which it is fought, there can be no neutrals; let our opinions be what they may, we must fight in self defence. We want nothing, we ask nothing, we would have nothing from this people. We only ask them for their own safety, and for ours, to take the least of the two evils. Most of them are destitutee of land, have but little property, are late emigrants to this country, without relations, friends, or enduring ties, to bind them to this land at the risque of such imminent peril to them and to us. We request them to leave us, when their crops are gathered, their business settled, and they have made every suitable preparation to remove. Those who have forty acres of land, we are willing, shall remain, until they can dispose of it without loss, if it should require years. But we urge, most strongly urge, that emigration cease and cease immediately, as nothing else can or will allay for a moment, the deep excitement that is now unhapily agitating this community. If the Mormons will comply with these friendly requisitions, we will use every exertion, among our own citizens, to arrest this evil before it is forever too late; but if they are disregarded, we can promise neither them or ourselves, a long continuation of the blessings of peace and harmony.
Resolutions 1st. Therefore, be it resolved by this meeting, that they view, with feelings of the deepest regret, the present unhappy situation of our country. [HC 2:451]
2nd. That it is the fixed and settled conviction of this meeting, that unless the people commonly called Mormons, will agree to stop immediately the emigration of their people to this , and take measures to remove themselves from it, a civil war is inevitable.
3d. That a committee of ten be appointed to make known to the leaders of that people. the views of this meeting, and to urge upon them the propriety, of acceeding to these propositions. [p. 738]
Page 738