History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​April 6​> — I know I am not, I have no private pique against .
The vote was then put and carried almost unanimously.
President Joseph Smith presented as his second Councillor, who was absent, and he was sustained by unanimous vote.
President Patriarch, said he wished to be tried, when it was voted unanimously that he retain his office of Patriarch. He then blessed the people, and asked the Lord to bless them also.
President Joseph said he did not know any thing against the Twelve if he did he would present them for trial. It is not right that all the burden of the , should rest on a few individuals; and we will now consider the propriety of sending the Twelve to collect means for it. There has been too great a solicitude, in individuals, for the building of the , to the exclusion of the . Agents have had too great latitude to practice fraud, by receiving donations and never making report. The Church has suffered loss, and I am opposed to that system of collecting funds when any elder may receive moneys.
I am opposed to any man’s handling the public funds of the church who is not duly authorized.
I advise that some means be devised for transacting business on a sure foundation. The Twelve are the most suitable persons to perform this business; and I want the conference to devise some means to bind them as firm as the pillars of heaven, if possible. The Twelve were always honest, and it will do them no hurt to bind them
It has been reported that they receive wages at two dollars per day for their services. I have never heard this till recently, and I do not believe it. I know the Twelve have never had any wages at all. They have [HC 5:329] fulfilled their duty— they have always gone where they were sent, and have labored with their hands for their support, when at home. If we send them into the world to collect funds, we want them to return those funds to this place, that they may be appropriated to the very purpose for which they were designed. I go in for binding up the Twelve, solid, putting them under bonds; and let this conference institute an order to this end, and that the travelling expenses of the agents shall not be borne out of the funds collected for building these houses, and let no man pay money or stock into the hands of the Twelve, except he transmit an account of the same immediately to the Trustee in Trust, and let no man but the Twelve have authority to act as agent for the and .
I would suggest the propriety of your saying that no money should ever be sent by any man except it be some one whom you have appointed as agent, and stop every other man from receiving moneys. It has been customary for any elder to receive moneys for the when he is travelling, but this system of things opens a wide field for every kind of imposition, as any man can assume the name of a Mormon elder, and gather his pockets full of money and go to Texas. Many complaints have come to me of money being sent that I have never received. I will mention one case. He is a good man; his name is Daniel Russell from Akron, . His brother Samuel had been east on business for him, and there received twenty or twenty-five dollars, as a donation to the , which he put in D. Russell’s bag, with his money, and forgot to take it out before he returned the bag. Two or three days after his [p. 1514]
April 6 — I know I am not, I have no private pique against .
The vote was then put and carried almost unanimously.
President Joseph Smith presented as his second Councillor, who was sustained by unanimous vote.
President Patriarch, said he wished to be tried, when it was voted unanimously that he retain his office of Patriarch. He then blessed the people, and asked the Lord to bless them also.
President Joseph said he did not know any thing against the Twelve if he did he would present them for trial. It is not right that all the burden of the , should rest on a few individuals; and we will now consider the propriety of sending the Twelve to collect means for it. There has been too great a solicitude, in individuals, for the building of the , to the exclusion of the . Agents have had too great latitude to practice fraud, by receiving donations and never making report. The Church has suffered loss, and I am opposed to that system of collecting funds when any elder may receive moneys.
I am opposed to any man’s handling the public funds of the church who is not duly authorized.
I advise that some means be devised for transacting business on a sure foundation. The Twelve are the most suitable persons to perform this business; and I want the conference to devise some means to bind them as firm as the pillars of heaven, if possible. The Twelve were always honest, and it will do them no hurt to bind them
It has been reported that they receive wages at two dollars per day for their services. I have never heard this till recently, and I do not believe it. I know the Twelve have never had any wages at all. They have [HC 5:329] fulfilled their duty— they have always gone where they were sent, and have labored with their hands for their support, when at home. If we send them into the world to collect funds, we want them to return those funds to this place, that they may be appropriated to the very purpose for which they were designed. I go in for binding up the Twelve, solid, putting them under bonds; and let this conference institute an order to this end, and that the travelling expenses of the agents shall not be borne out of the funds collected for building these houses, and let no man pay money or stock into the hands of the Twelve, except he transmit an account of the same immediately to the Trustee in Trust, and let no man but the Twelve have authority to act as agent for the and .
I would suggest the propriety of your saying that no money should ever be sent by any man except it be some one whom you have appointed as agent, and stop every other man from receiving moneys. It has been customary for any elder to receive moneys for the when he is travelling, but this system of things opens a wide field for every kind of imposition, as any man can assume the name of a Mormon elder, and gather his pockets full of money and go to Texas. Many complaints have come to me of money being sent that I have never received. I will mention one case. He is a good man; his name is Daniel Russell from Akron, . His brother Samuel had been east on business for him, and there received twenty or twenty-five dollars, as a donation to the , which he put in D. Russell’s bag, with his money, and forgot to take it out before he returned the bag. Two or three days after his [p. 1514]
Page 1514