History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 132
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continued to <do> day day after day through the  journey. & when my brothers remonstrated with Mr Howard  for his treatment to me he would knock them down  with the butt of his whip.— When we arrived at  Utica, N. York Howard threw the Goods out of the  waggon into the street. & attempted to run away  with the Horses & Waggon, but my seized the  horses, by the reign, &, calling witnesses forbid his  taking them away as they were her property. on  our way from Utica I was left to ride on the last  waggon <Sleigh.> in the Company, <(the Gates family were in sleighs)> but when that came up  I was knocked down by the driver, one of Gate’s  Sons, & left to wollow in my blood until a stranger  came along, picked me up, & carried me to the Town  of .— Howard having spent all our funds  my was compelled to pay our landlords  bills from Utica to , in bits of cloth,  clothing &c the last payment being made with  the drops taken from Sister ’s ears,  for that purpose. Although the snow was generally  deep through the country during this journey we  performed the whole <on> except wheels, except the first  two days, when we were accompanied by My s  mother, Grand-mother, <Lydia Mack>, who was injured  by the upsetting of the Sleigh, & not wishing to accompany  her frie[n]ds west, tarried by the way with her frie[n]ds  in , & we soon after heard of her death  supposing that she never recovered from the injury  received by the overturn of the Sleigh[2 lines blank]

Addenda, Note B • 1820–1823

Note B. (page 3)
When the light had departed, I had
no strength, but soon recovering  in some degree I went home. And as I leaned up to the  fire piece enquired what the matter was. I replied  never mind all is well— I am well enough— off. I  then told my I have learned for myself that  Presbyterianism is not True.— It seems as though the  adversary was aware at a very early period of my  life that I was destined to prove a disturbere & [p. 132]
continued to do day day after day through the journey. & when my brothers remonstrated with Mr Howard for his treatment to me he would knock them down with the butt of his whip.— When we arrived at Utica, N. York Howard threw the Goods out of the waggon into the street. & attempted to run away with the Horses & Waggon, but my seized the horses, by the reign, &, calling witnesses forbid his taking them away as they were her property. on our way from Utica I was left to ride on the last Sleigh. in the Company, (the Gates family were in sleighs) but when that came up I was knocked down by the driver, one of Gate’s Sons, & left to wollow in my blood until a stranger came along, picked me up, & carried me to the Town of .— Howard having spent all our funds my was compelled to pay our landlords bills from Utica to , in bits of cloth, clothing &c the last payment being made with the drops taken from Sister ’s ears, for that purpose. Although the snow was generally deep through the country during this journey we performed the whole on wheels, except the first two days, when we were accompanied by My s mother, Grand-mother, Lydia Mack, who was injured by the upsetting of the Sleigh, & not wishing to accompany her friends west, tarried by the way with her friends in , & we soon after heard of her death supposing that she never recovered from the injury received by the overturn of the Sleigh[2 lines blank]

Addenda, Note B • 1820–1823

Note B. (page 3)
When the light had departed, I had
no strength, but soon recovering in some degree I went home. And as I leaned up to the fire piece enquired what the matter was. I replied never mind all is well— I am well enough— off. I then told my I have learned for myself that Presbyterianism is not True.— It seems as though the adversary was aware at a very early period of my life that I was destined to prove a disturbere & [p. 132]
Page 132