History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 490
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and I shall enjoy the consolation of having done my duty as a man, as well as a christian.
I hope sir, you will duly appreciate the motive which prompts me to appreciate <address> this letter to you, and will aid me with all your influence with your brethren, in the prosecution of an object so much to be desired by all good men and Citizens.”
“Yours very Respectfully, ,”
12 June 1834 • Thursday
June 12th. we left , and travelled about 14. miles, encamping that night on the prairie. The inhabitants of <the neighborhood of> manifested a great respect for us, and many of them accompanied us some distance on our journey. <(note 12 page 13) then (note L page 6.)> [HC 2:90] We continued our march daily until the 18th when we pitched our tents’ one mile from , Ray county, having met <from , while we were in camp at wacontah River 2 or 3 days previous from whom we learned the hostile feeling of the Missourians against us>
14 June 1834 • Saturday
* In answer to the wrote
Near , 14th June 1834
“Hon ,
“Dear Sir, Your communication of the 9th. instant, from , was duly received, and at a public meeting of our society this day, its contents were made known.— Our brethren unanimously tender their thanks for the laudable disposition manifested on your part to effect peace between our society and. the inhabitants of , and as many as conveniently can will be present on Monday next. Entertaining some fear that your honor in his zeal for peace, might unwarily recommend a sale of our lands in , we have thought it expedient to give seasonable notice that no such proposition could possibly be acceded to, by our society.
We have not heard that it was the intention of your honor to urge any such measure, but our enemies in have long been laying to effect this object. In a letter from the to us, he says, “I have been requested to advise the Mormons to sell out and move away, but believing that it could have no good effect, I have withheld my advice.” We give this quotation from the ’s letter to disprove the statement made in the “Upper Missouri Enquirer” of last wednesday, and conclude [p. 490]
and I shall enjoy the consolation of having done my duty as a man, as well as a christian.
I hope sir, you will duly appreciate the motive which prompts me to address this letter to you, and will aid me with all your influence with your brethren, in the prosecution of an object so much to be desired by all good men and Citizens.”
“Yours very Respectfully, ,”
12 June 1834 • Thursday
June 12th. we left , and travelled about 14. miles, The inhabitants manifested a great respect for us, and many of them accompanied us some distance on our journey. (note 12 page 13) then (note L page 6.) [HC 2:90]
14 June 1834 • Saturday
* In answer to the wrote
Near , 14th June 1834
“Hon ,
“Dear Sir, Your communication of the 9th. instant, from , was duly received, and at a public meeting of our society this day, its contents made known.— Our brethren unanimously tender their thanks for the laudable disposition manifested on your part to effect peace between our society and. the inhabitants of , and as many as conveniently can will be present on Monday next. Entertaining some fear that your honor in his zeal for peace, might unwarily recommend a sale of our lands in , we have thought it expedient to give seasonable notice that no such proposition could possibly be acceded to, by our society.
We have not heard that it was the intention of your honor to urge any such measure, but our enemies in have long been laying to effect this object. In a letter from the to us, he says, “I have been requested to advise the Mormons to sell out and move away, but believing that it could have no good effect, I have withheld my advice.” We give this quotation from the ’s letter to disprove the statement made in the “Upper Missouri Enquirer” of last wednesday, and conclude [p. 490]
Page 490