History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 497
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The earth trembled and quaked, the rain fell in torrents, and, united, it seemed as if the mandate of vengeance had gone forth from the God of battles to protect his servants from the destruction of their enemies, for the hail fell on them, and not on us, and we suffered no harm except the blowing down of some of our tents and getting some wet, while our enemies had holes made in their hats and otherwise received damage, even the breaking of their rifle stocks and the fleeing of their horses through fear and pain.
Many of my little band shelterd in an old meeting house through this night, and in the morning, the water in Big Fishing river, was about forty feet deep, where the previous evening it was no more than to our ankles: And our enemies swore that the water rose thirty feet in thirty minutes in the Little Fishing River. <they reported that one (Note 16 pa. 16)>
20–21 June 1834 • Friday–Saturday
Friday the 20th. <#> we went five miles on the prairie to <where we could> procure food for ourselves and horses, and establish ourselves for the moment in some secure place where we could defend ourselves from the rage of our enemies, and while in this situation on Saturday the 21st. Colonel Scarcey <Scarcy Sconce> with two other leading men from , came to see us, desiring to know what our [HC 2:105] intentions were; for, said he, “I see that there is an Almighty power that protects this people, for I started from Ray County, with a company of armed men, having a fixed determination to destroy you, but was kept back by the storm, and was not able to reach you,” When he entered the our camp he was seized with such a trembling that he was ob[l]iged to sit down to compose himself; and when he had made known his the object of their visit; I arose, and addressing them gave a relation of the sufferings of the Saints in , and also of our persecutions generally, and what we had suffered by our enemies for our religion;— and that we had come one thousand miles to assist our brethren, to bring them clothing, &c, and to reinstate them upon their own lands: and that we had no intention to molest or injure any people, but only to administer to the wants of our afflicted friends; and that the evil reports circulated about us were false, and got up by our enemies [p. 497]
The earth trembled and quaked, the rain fell in torrents, and, united, it seemed as if the mandate of vengeance had gone forth from the God of battles to protect his servants from the destruction of their enemies, for the hail fell on them, and not on us, and we suffered no harm except the blowing down of some of our tents and getting wet, while our enemies had holes made in their hats and otherwise received damage, even the breaking of their rifle stocks and the fleeing of their horses through fear and pain.
Many of my little band shelterd in an old meeting house through this night, and in the morning, the water in Big Fishing river, was about forty feet deep, where the previous evening it was no more than to our ankles: And our enemies swore that the water rose thirty feet in thirty minutes in the Little Fishing River. they reported that one (Note 16 pa. 16)
20–21 June 1834 • Friday–Saturday
# we went five miles on the prairie where we could procure food for ourselves and horses, and defend ourselves from the rage of our enemies, while in this situation on Saturday the 21st. Colonel Sconce with two other leading men from , came to see us, desiring to know what our [HC 2:105] intentions were; for, said he, “I see that there is an Almighty power that protects this people, for I started from Ray County, with a company of armed men, having a fixed determination to destroy you, but was kept back by the storm, and was not able to reach you,” When he entered our camp he was seized with such a trembling that he was obliged to sit down to compose himself; and when he had made known the object of their visit; I arose, and addressing them gave a relation of the sufferings of the Saints in , and also of our persecutions generally, and what we had suffered by our enemies for our religion;— and that we had come one thousand miles to assist our brethren, to bring them clothing, &c, and to reinstate them upon their own lands: and that we had no intention to molest or injure any people, but only to administer to the wants of our afflicted friends; and that the evil reports circulated about us were false, and got up by our enemies [p. 497]
Page 497