History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 14 [addenda]
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to us from Jefferson City— <and reported that refused to fulfil his promise to reinstate the brethren on their land in on the ground of impracticability. We> crossed the Chariton River at its mouth, and encamped on the west  bank— came into the Camp from — we received much information  from him concerning the hostile feelings and prejudices that existed against us in  in all quarters <but it gave us great satisfaction to receive intelligence from him of the union and good feeling that prevailed among the brethren> as we were in perils, and threatened all the while— we were much troubled  to get provisions and had to live principally on corn meal and was glad to get that— Here   was by
Monday 16 Travelled to, ferried over, and encamped on the bank of , the Ferryman intended  charging seventeen dollars, the brethren said they would not pay it, but would sooner make a  raft and ferry themselves over, he then agreed to take them over for twelve dollars which we  accepted— this morning was excessively hot, no air stirring, and travelling in the thick woods, a thunder  shower coming on, the brethren caught all the water they could on the brims of their hats, and not catching  enough to satisfy their thirst they drank out of the horse tracks— having  boasted to the brethren that he could handle snakes with perfect safety, while fooling with a black snake  with his bare feet, he received a bite on his left foot, it was communicated to me, and I took occasion  to reprove him, and exhort the brethren never to trifle with the promses of God— I told them it was  presumption for any one to provoke a serpent to bite him, but if a man of God was accidentally  bitten by a poisonous serpent, he might have faith, or his brethren might have faith for him, so that  the Lord would hear his prayer and he might be healed— but when a man designedly provokes  a serpent to bite him, the principle is the same, as when a man drinks deadly poison knowing  it to be such— in that case no man has any claim on the promises of God to be healed— (Page 491#)

Addenda, Note 15 • 17–19 June 1834

<Note 15.> Tuesday 17. about <At> noon we crossed the Wacondah, it being high, we had to be ferried over, we were—  informed here, that a party of men were gathered together on the , with the intention  of attacking us that night. The prairie ahead of us was twenty three miles long without any timber  or <palatable, healthy,> water, some of the brethren wished to stop near the timber and were about making arrangments  to pitch their tents, we had but little provisions— I proposed to get some wood and water <to> carry with  us, and go on the Prairie 8 or 10 miles— my brother said he knew in the name of the  Lord, that it was best to go on to the Prairie, and as he was my Elder Brother I thought best to  heed his counsel, though some were murmuring in the Camp— we accordingly started. When   crossed the River, he disapproved of our moving on to the Prairie, upon which who had been appointed Adjutant of the Camp, placed himself in the road, turned back all  that he could by saying “are you following your General or some other man,” and some twenty staid  behind with — we drove about 8 miles on the Prairie and encamped out of sight  of Timber, the sun apparently went down, and rose again in the Grass— our company had filled  a couple of empty Powder Kegs with Water, it tasted so bad we could not drink it, and all that the water  that we had was out of a Slough filled with red living animals, and was putrid— about Eleven o clock   arrived with the company that had remained with him— I called them together and  reproved them for tarrying behind, and not obeying my council, and told never to do so  again, he promised that he would stand by me for ever, and never forsake me again let the—  consequence be what it would— but manifested very refractory feelings.
Wednesday 18. as Hyrum [Hiram] Stratton and his companion were taking up their blankets this morning they [p. 14 [addenda]]
to us from Jefferson City— and reported that refused to fulfil his promise to reinstate the brethren on their land in on the ground of impracticability. We crossed the Chariton River at its mouth, and encamped on the west bank— came into the Camp from — we received much information from him concerning the hostile feelings and prejudices that existed against us in in all quarters but it gave us great satisfaction to receive intelligence from him of the union and good feeling that prevailed among the brethren as we were in perils, and threatened all the while— we were much troubled to get provisions and had to live principally on corn meal and was glad to get that— Here was by
Monday 16 Travelled to, ferried over, and encamped on the bank of , the Ferryman intended charging seventeen dollars, the brethren said they would not pay it, but would sooner make a raft and ferry themselves over, he then agreed to take them over for twelve dollars which we accepted— this morning was excessively hot, no air stirring, and travelling in the thick woods, a thunder shower coming on, the brethren caught all the water they could on the brims of their hats, and not catching enough to satisfy their thirst they drank out of the horse tracks— having boasted to the brethren that he could handle snakes with perfect safety, while fooling with a black snake with his bare feet, he received a bite on his left foot, it was communicated to me, and I took occasion to reprove him, and exhort the brethren never to trifle with the promses of God— I told them it was presumption for any one to provoke a serpent to bite him, but if a man of God was accidentally bitten by a poisonous serpent, he might have faith, or his brethren might have faith for him, so that the Lord would hear his prayer and he might be healed— but when a man designedly provokes a serpent to bite him, the principle is the same, as when a man drinks deadly poison knowing it to be such— in that case no man has any claim on the promises of God to be healed— (Page 491#)

Addenda, Note 15 • 17–19 June 1834

Note 15. Tuesday 17. At noon we crossed the Wacondah, it being high, we had to be ferried over, we were— informed here, that a party of men were gathered together on the , with the intention of attacking us that night. The prairie ahead of us was twenty three miles long without any timber or palatable, healthy, water, some of the brethren wished to stop near the timber and were about making arrangments to pitch their tents, we had but little provisions— I proposed to get some wood and water to carry with us, and go on the Prairie 8 or 10 miles— my brother said he knew in the name of the Lord, that it was best to go on to the Prairie, and as he was my Elder Brother I thought best to heed his counsel, though some were murmuring in the Camp— we accordingly started. When crossed the River, he disapproved of our moving on to the Prairie, upon which , placed himself in the road, turned back all that he could by saying “are you following your General or some other man,” and twenty staid behind with — we drove about 8 miles on the Prairie and encamped out of sight of Timber, the sun apparently went down, and rose again in the Grass— our company had filled a couple of empty Powder Kegs with Water, it tasted so bad we could not drink it, and all the water that we had was out of a Slough filled with red living animals, and was putrid— about Eleven o clock arrived with the company that had remained with him— I called them together and reproved them for tarrying behind, and not obeying my council, and told never to do so again, he promised that he would stand by me for ever, and never forsake me again let the— consequence be what it would— but manifested very refractory feelings.
Wednesday 18. as Hyrum [Hiram] Stratton and his companion were taking up their blankets this morning they [p. 14 [addenda]]
Page 14 [addenda]