History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 9 [addenda]
image
they saw the fires of the mob on the South East of us— I instantly arose, and discovered the mistake, but wishing  the brethren to enjoy the scene as well as myself, immediately discharged my Gun which was a signal  to call all men to arms, when the companies were all paraded and ready for battle— I pointed them  to the reflection of the rising of the moon, resting on points of timber in the East, which gave the appearance of  the reflection of the light of a number of Camp Fires, the scenery was most delightful and was well worth  the trouble of any man rising from his Couch to witness, who had never seen the like on the broad prairie before  this circumstance proved that nearly every man in the Camp was ready for battle except who  was not baptized, and captain who was suddenly taken with the Cholic, and did not  leave his tent; the whole scenery was very amusing. (see page 481)+
Addenda, Note 6 • 27–29 May 1834
<Note 6> and carried most <some> of their baggage on their backs— while we were passing over, discovered a Spring  which with a little digging furnished us with an abundant supply of excellent water and <which afterwards> received the  name of “the Mormon Spring”— some time This afternoon an aged brother  of the having became exceedingly weary, laid down on the Prairie to rest himself and fell asleep,  when he awoke, saw a Rattle Snake which lay between him and his hat, which he had in his hand  when he fell asleep, coiled up within one foot of his head, the brethren gathered round him, saying  it is a Rattle snake let us kill it, but said “no, Ill protect him, you shant hurt  him, for he and I have had a good nap together.”
Wednesday 28 we passed on as usual, except suffering much for want of water and provisions, and  arrived at Decatur <township,> encamped on a small stream of water where one of ’s horses died
Thursday 29 Having to buy a horse we were detained until near noon, there was some murmuring  among the brethren, many wishing to go on and not tarry with the rest of the Company for the day, and some  had already started. I sent for them to return and collect<ed> the whole Camp together, and instructed them not to  scatter. I told them if they went ahead of the Camp in a scattered condition, they would become weary,  lie down on the ground when their blood was hot, and very likely in the Sun, they would be liable to take  diseases, such as Ague and fever which is so prevalent in this climate, as they ought never to be on the ground  (which is always damp) when their blood is hot, they would also be in danger of being killed by an enemy, and none  of us be the wiser for it. I then proposed that for a diversion we divide the Camp into three parts, and have a  sham battle, which was agreed to by all— brother led one part, another  division, and I remained in the Camp with the third division— they retired to the woods with their divisions  and soon attacked the Camp which we defended by various maneuvres for some time, many of our  Captains showed considerable tact and more acquaintance with military matters than I had expected  every thing passed off with good feelings, altho’ Captain in receiving a charge, grasped Captain <Lewis>  Zabriski’s sword, and in endeavoring to take it from him had the skin cut from the palm of his hand. After  the sham battle was over, I called the Camp together, and cautioned them to be careful in all future time  and control their Spirits in such circumstances so as never to injure each other; we travelled across the  Prairie and encamped in a strip of Timber— when we stopped to dine this day I wrote a letter to the  brethren in -[dated “Camp of Israel”]- requesting some of them to meet us as soon as possible, and  give us information of the state of things in Upper , and sent the letter to Post Office by  — at this place I discovered that a part of my company had been served with sour bread, while  I had received good sweet bread from the same Cook. I reproved brother , for this partiality, [p. 9 [addenda]]
they saw the fires of the mob on the South East of us— I instantly arose, and discovered the mistake, but wishing the brethren to enjoy the scene as well as myself, immediately discharged my Gun which was a signal to call all men to arms, when the companies were all paraded and ready for battle— I pointed them to the reflection of the rising moon, resting on points of timber in the East, which gave the appearance of the reflection of the light of a number of Camp Fires, the scenery was most delightful and was well worth the trouble of any man rising from his Couch to witness, who had never seen the like on the broad prairie before this circumstance proved that nearly every man in the Camp was ready for battle except who was not baptized, and captain who was suddenly taken with the Cholic, and did not leave his tent; the whole scenery was very amusing. (see page 481)+
Addenda, Note 6 • 27–29 May 1834
Note 6 and carried some of their baggage on their backs— while we were passing over, discovered a Spring which with a little digging furnished us with an abundant supply of excellent water which afterwards received the name of “the Mormon Spring”— This afternoon an aged brother of the having became exceedingly weary, laid down on the Prairie to rest himself and fell asleep, when he awoke, saw a Rattle Snake which lay between him and his hat, which he had in his hand when he fell asleep, coiled up within one foot of his head, the brethren gathered round him, saying it is a Rattle snake let us kill it, but said “no, Ill protect him, you shant hurt him, for he and I have had a good nap together.”
Wednesday 28 we passed on as usual, except suffering much for want of water and provisions, and arrived at Decatur township, encamped on a small stream of water where one of ’s horses died
Thursday 29 Having to buy a horse we were detained until near noon, there was some murmuring among the brethren, many wishing to go on and not tarry with the rest of the Company for the day, and some had already started. I sent for them to return and collected the whole Camp together, and instructed them not to scatter. I told them if they went ahead of the Camp in a scattered condition, they would become weary, lie down on the ground when their blood was hot, and very likely in the Sun, they would be liable to take diseases, such as Ague and fever which is prevalent in this climate, as they ought never to be on the ground (which is always damp) when their blood is hot, they would also be in danger of being killed by an enemy, and none of us be the wiser for it. I then proposed that for a diversion we divide the Camp into three parts, and have a sham battle, which was agreed to by all— brother led one part, another division, and I remained in the Camp with the third division— they retired to the woods with their divisions and soon attacked the Camp which we defended by various maneuvres for some time, many of our Captains showed considerable tact and more acquaintance with military matters than I had expected every thing passed off with good feelings, altho’ Captain in receiving a charge, grasped Captain Lewis Zabriski’s sword, and in endeavoring to take it from him had the skin cut from the palm of his hand. After the sham battle was over, I called the Camp together, and cautioned them to be careful in future and control their Spirits in such circumstances so as never to injure each other; we travelled across the Prairie and encamped in a strip of Timber— when we stopped to dine I wrote a letter to the brethren in -[dated “Camp of Israel”]- requesting some of them to meet us as soon as possible, and give us information of the state of things in Upper , and sent the letter to Post Office by — at this place I discovered that a part of my company had been served with sour bread, while I had received good sweet bread from the same Cook. I reproved brother , for this partiality, [p. 9 [addenda]]
Page 9 [addenda]