History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 13 [addenda]
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of the had a disposition to scatter thro’ the woods for hunting but I advised them to the contrary— some of the brethren went on to the sand bar, and got a quantity of Turtle’s eggs as they supposed, I told them they were Snake’s eggs and they must not eat them, but some of them thought they knew more than I did about it, and still persisted they were Turtle Eggs— I said they were Snake’s eggs, eat Snake’s Eggs will you? the man that eats them will be sorry for it, you will be sick, notwithstanding all I said— one or two of the <several> brethren eat <ate> of them, and were sick all the day after it
Thursday 5. We crossed the Mississippi, which was a tedious job having but one <small flat> boat <to page 483#>
Addenda, Note 9 • 6–7 June 1834
<Note 9> endeavored <to> procure some milk— a number of men armed with guns met him and said “here’s one damd mormon alone, let’s kill him.” but at the same instant discovered a number of others just coming over the hill, when they immediately rode off in great haste. see page 488+
Addenda, Note 10 • 6–7 June 1834
<Note 10> and were taught the sword exercise by brother <William> Cherry, (who was a native of Ireland) an expert drill master, who had been in the British Dragoon Service for upwards of twenty years and deserves much credit for his unwearied exertions for <in> imparting all he knew to the brethren, this was the <our> first attempt of the brethren at learning the sword exercise— brothers Hiram Stratton and Nelson Tubbs procured a shop of Myers Mobley and repaired every firelock that was out of order, and shod our horses. here brother was taken sick I proposed to him to remain behind, he said “brother Joseph, let me go with you if I die on the Road”. I told him in the name of the Lord that if that was his faith to go on his bed in the waggon, and he should get better every day until he recovered— which was literally fulfilled see page 488*
Addenda, Note 11 • 6–7 June 1834
<Note 11.> and others of the branch, in all about 12, joined our Company— about this time I dispatched Elders and to Jefferson City with a message to to ascertain if he was ready to fulfil the proposition which he had previously made to the brethren to reinstate them on their lands in and leave them there to defend themselves. see page 488#
Addenda, Note 12 • 12 June 1834
<Note 12> I instructed the in the morning that if a gun was fired it would be considered an alarm, but in the course of the day, while I was a little ahead, I shot a squirrel for brother Foster when several of the brethren came running up to see what was the matter, I told them brother Foster was sick, I want you should pray for him.
then Note L page 6.
Addenda, Note 13 • 14 June 1834
<Note 13> Saturday 14 brother , and another of the brethren were chased a— considerable portion of the day by four suspicious fellows on horseback armed with Guns, whom they eluded by travelling in the brush and thickets where horsemen could not ride— it was late when they returned to the Camp— at night we encamped in an unsafe and unpleasant situation in a small ravine— the only place we could get water for some miles— The Country was a wild, uncultivated region. (see page 490)*
Addenda, Note 14 • 15–16 June 1834
<Note 14> Sunday 15 Traveled Twelve miles, on the way and returned [p. 13 [addenda]]
of the had a disposition to scatter thro’ the woods for hunting but I advised them to the contrary— some of the brethren went on to the sand bar, and got a quantity of Turtle’s eggs as they supposed, I told them they were Snake’s eggs and they must not eat them, but some of them thought they knew more than I did about it, and still persisted they were Turtle Eggs— I said they were Snake’s eggs, eat Snake’s Eggs will you? the man that eats them will be sorry for it, you will be sick, notwithstanding all I said— several brethren eat them, and were sick all the day after it
Thursday 5. We crossed the Mississippi, which was a tedious job having but one small flat boat to page 483#
Addenda, Note 9 • 6–7 June 1834
Note 9 to procure some milk— a number of men armed with guns met him and said “here’s one damd mormon alone, let’s kill him.” but at the same instant discovered a number of others just coming over the hill, when they immediately rode off in great haste. see page 488+
Addenda, Note 10 • 6–7 June 1834
Note 10 and were taught the sword exercise by brother William Cherry, (who was a native of Ireland) an expert drill master, who had been in the British Dragoon Service for upwards of twenty years and deserves much credit for his unwearied exertions in imparting all he knew to the brethren, this was our first attempt at learning the sword exercise— brothers Hiram Stratton and Nelson Tubbs procured a shop of Myers Mobley and repaired every firelock that was out of order, and shod our horses. here brother was taken sick I proposed to him to remain behind, he said “brother Joseph, let me go with you if I die on the Road”. I told him in the name of the Lord that if that was his faith to go on his bed in the waggon, and he should get better every day until he recovered— which was literally fulfilled see page 488*
Addenda, Note 11 • 6–7 June 1834
Note 11. — about this time I dispatched Elders and to Jefferson City with a message to to ascertain if he was ready to fulfil the proposition which he had previously made to the brethren to reinstate them on their lands in and leave them there to defend themselves. see page 488#
Addenda, Note 12 • 12 June 1834
Note 12 I instructed the in the morning that if a gun was fired it would be considered an alarm, but in the course of the day, while I was a little ahead, I shot a squirrel for brother Foster when several of the brethren came running up to see what was the matter, I told them brother Foster was sick, I want you should pray for him.
then Note L page 6.
Addenda, Note 13 • 14 June 1834
Note 13 Saturday 14 brother , and another of the brethren were chased a— considerable portion of the day by four suspicious fellows on horseback armed with Guns, whom they eluded by travelling in the brush and thickets where horsemen could not ride— it was late when they returned to the Camp— at night we encamped in an unsafe and unpleasant situation in a small ravine— the only place we could get water for some miles— The Country was a wild, uncultivated region. (see page 490)*
Addenda, Note 14 • 15–16 June 1834
Note 14 Sunday 15 Traveled Twelve miles, on the way and returned [p. 13 [addenda]]
Page 13 [addenda]