History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 461
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and established forever, and even at last to receive a crown of life. Our hearts rejoiced and we were comforted with the Holy Spirit. [HC 2:51]
20 April 1834 • Sunday
Sunday April 20th. entertained a large congregation of saints with an interesting discourse upon the , &c.
The of wrote the brethren as follows, in reply to their last letter:
“City of Jefferson, April 20th. 1834.”
“To Messrs. . , , , &
Gentlemen, Yours of the 10th. instant was received yesterday, in which you request me, as Executive of this State, to join you in an appeal to the President of the for protection in the enjoyment of your rights in . It will readily occur to you, no doubt, the possibility of your having asked of the President, protection in a way that he, no more than the Executive of this State, can render. If you have for that which I may be of opinion he has power to grant, I should have no objection to join in urging it upon him. But I could no more ask the President, however willing I am to see your Society restored and protected in their rights, to do that which I may believe he has no power to do, than I could do such an act myself. If you will send me a copy of your Petition to the President, I will judge of his right to grant it, and if of opinion he possesses the power, I will write in favor of its exercise.
“I am now in correspondence with the Federal government on the subject of deposits of munitions of war on our Northern and Western borders, and have no doubt but shall succeed in procuring one, which will be located, if left to me, (and the Secretary at War seems [HC 1:488] willing to be governed by the opinion of the Executive of this State), some where near the State line, either in or Counties. The establishment will be an “arsenal,” and will, probably be placed under the command of a Lieutenant of the army. This will afford you the best means of military protection the nature of your case will admit. Although I [p. 461]
and established forever, and even at last to receive a crown of life. Our hearts rejoiced and we were comforted with the Holy Spirit. [HC 2:51]
20 April 1834 • Sunday
Sunday April 20th. entertained a large congregation of saints with an interesting discourse upon the , &c.
The of wrote the brethren as follows, in reply to their last letter:
“City of Jefferson, April 20th. 1834.”
“To Messrs. . , , , &
Gentlemen, Yours of the 10th. instant was received yesterday, in which you request me, as Executive of this State, to join you in an appeal to the President of the for protection in the enjoyment of your rights in . It will readily occur to you, no doubt, the possibility of your having asked of the President, protection in a way that he, no more than the Executive of this State, can render. If you have for that which I may be of opinion he has power to grant, I should have no objection to join in urging it upon him. But I could no more ask the President, however willing I am to see your Society restored and protected in their rights, to do that which I may believe he has no power to do, than I could do such an act myself. If you will send me a copy of your Petition to the President, I will judge of his right to grant it, and if of opinion he possesses the power, I will write in favor of its exercise.
“I am now in correspondence with the Federal government on the subject of deposits of munitions of war on our Northern and Western borders, and have no doubt but shall succeed in procuring one, which will be located, if left to me, (and the Secretary at War seems [HC 1:488] willing to be governed by the opinion of the Executive of this State), some where near the State line, either in or Counties. The establishment will be an “arsenal,” and will, probably be placed under the command of a Lieutenant of the army. This will afford you the best means of military protection the nature of your case will admit. Although I [p. 461]
Page 461