History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 6 [addenda]
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, who had just returned from where he had turned out  his horses to feed, came up, and hearing me make these remarks, said,  “if that dog bites me, I’ll kill him.” I turned to and said,  “if you kill that dog, I’ll whip you”, and went on to show the  brethren how wicked and unchristianlike such conduct appeared  before the eyes of truth and justice. Page 484.

Addenda, Note K • 6–7 June 1834

<Note K> Here we remained several days, washing our clothes and preparing to pursue  our Journey, when <Sunday 8th.> we were joined on the 9th. <8th.> by my brother and  , with another company. who started from Pontiac, Michigan  Territory, May 5th., the same day we started from , having passed  through Ann Arbour, Jacksonsburgh, Spring Arbour, Constantine, Elkhart,  crossed the Illinois River, one mile below Ottawa, Pleasant Grove, Pekin,   and Palmyra— was their historian;  Steward; and Samuel Bent, moderators, We had agreed  to meet at this point, and the first company that arrived, was to wait  for the other. <soon after the arrival of and his company I dispatched brother and with  messages to the brethren in , fearing that the letter which I sent from had miscarried.> The Camp <James Allred Senr. and ten others of this Branch, joined our which>now numbered two hundred and five men,  all armed and equipped as the Law directs.” It was delightful to see  the Company, for they were all young men <except one company which <whom> we called the Silver Grays, and who eat at my little table> with one or two <a few> exceptions, <we were> all  in good Spirits— see Note 10. addenda page 13

Addenda, Note L • 13 June 1834

<Note L> Friday 13th. ’s horses <thro’ the negligence of the guards,> got loose, and went back ten miles with  others. He pursued after them and returned back <with them> to the Camp. in about two  hours. We tarried in the middle of this Prairie which is about twenty eight  miles across, on account of a rupture which took place in the Camp. Here   and , received a very serious chastisement for <neglect> not  obeying <of> orders previously given <in not taking care of the Teams, when in charge of the guard.> The chastisement <reproof> given to , was  given more particularly for suffering to go back after the horses  as he was one of my life guards, and it belonged to to attend to <see that> the team  <was attended to,> but as the team was ’s, and he had <taken> the care of it all through,  still throwed the care on <him>. , which was contrary to orders, inasmuch as  the responsibility rested upon him to see to the teams. In this place Further  regulations were made in regard to the organization of the Church camp. <by attaching The Silver Grey company numbering fourteen, attached to my mess making it 28 in number—>
(see note 13— page 13)

Addenda, Note 1 • 12–17 May 1834

<“No. 1”> travelled about 35 miles, <passed thru Biscyrus,> and encamped on the Sandusky Plains, at a short distance from the place  <13th.> where the Indians roasted Gen. Crawford, and near the Indian Settlements— <On> The next day 13th. we passed  through a long range of Beech Woods, where the Roads were very bad. In many instances we had to  fasten ropes to the waggons to haul them out of the sloughs and mud holes— Brother  broke his harness, and the brethren fastened their ropes to his waggon, and drew it about three miles to  the place of encampment on the Scioto River while he rode, on the top singing and whistling.
<Wednesday> 14th. We passed on to Belle Fontaine, where we discovered refractory feelings in who [p. 6 [addenda]]
, who had just returned from where he had turned out his horses to feed, came up, and hearing me make these remarks, said, “if that dog bites me, I’ll kill him.” I turned to and said, “if you kill that dog, I’ll whip you”, and went on to show the brethren how wicked and unchristianlike such conduct appeared before the eyes of truth and justice. Page 484.

Addenda, Note K • 6–7 June 1834

Note K Here we remained several days, washing our clothes and preparing to pursue our Journey, Sunday 8th. we were by my brother and , with another company. who started from Pontiac, Michigan Territory, May 5th., the same day we started from , having passed through Ann Arbour, Jacksonsburgh, Spring Arbour, Constantine, Elkhart, crossed the Illinois River, one mile below Ottawa, Pleasant Grove, Pekin, and Palmyra— was their historian; Steward; and Samuel Bent, moderators, We had agreed to meet at this point, and the first company that arrived, was to wait for the other. soon after the arrival of and his company I dispatched brother and with messages to the brethren in , fearing that the letter which I sent from had miscarried. James Allred Senr. and ten others of this Branch, joined our whichnow numbered two hundred and five men, all armed and equipped as the Law directs.” It was delightful to see the Company, for they were all young men except one company whom we called the Silver Grays, and who eat at my table we were all in good Spirits— see Note 10. addenda page 13

Addenda, Note L • 13 June 1834

Note L Friday 13th. ’s horses thro’ the negligence of the guards, got loose, and went back ten miles with others. He pursued them and returned with them to Camp. and , received a very serious chastisement for neglect of orders in not taking care of the Teams, when in charge of the guard. The reproof given to , was more particularly for suffering to go back after the horses as he was one of my life guards, and it belonged to to see that the team was attended to, but as the team was ’s, and he had taken the care of it all through, still throwed the care on him. ” The Silver Grey company numbering fourteen, attached to my mess making it 28 in number—
(see note 13— page 13)

Addenda, Note 1 • 12–17 May 1834

“No. 1” travelled about 35 miles, passed thru Biscyrus, and encamped on the Sandusky Plains, at a short distance from the place 13th. where the Indians roasted Gen. Crawford, and near the Indian Settlements— On The 13th. we passed through a long range of Beech Woods, where the Roads were very bad. In many instances we had to fasten ropes to the waggons to haul them out of the sloughs and mud holes— Brother broke his harness, the brethren fastened their ropes to his waggon, and drew it about three miles to the place of encampment on the Scioto River while he rode, singing and whistling.
Wednesday 14th. We passed on to Belle Fontaine, where we discovered refractory feelings in who [p. 6 [addenda]]
Page 6 [addenda]