History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 475
houses, or many of them. Our people had about one hundred and seventy buildings in , and a bonfire of nearly all of them at once, must have made a light large enough to have glared on the dark deed and cup of iniquity running over, at midnight.
“The crisis has come. All who will not take up arms with the mob and prepare to fight the “Mormons,” have to leave . I understand some have left the county because they refused to fight an innocent people. It is said the mob will hold a “general muster” this week for the purpose of learning who is who. They begin to slip over the and commit small depredations upon our brethren settled near the river, as we have reason to believe.
“It is said to be enough to shock the stoutest heart to witness the drinking swearing, and ravings of most of the mob; nothing but the power of God can stop them in their Latter Day crusade against the .
Our brethren are very industrious in putting in spring crops; and they are generally in good health, and the faithful, in strong faith of a glorious hereafter.
I remain yours &c.— .”
2 May 1834 • Friday
All hopes of relief from the general government was destroyed on receipt of the following communication from the City of
“War Department, May 2d. 1834,”
“Gentlemen, The President has referred to this department the memorial and letter addressed to him by yourselves and other citizens of , requesting his interposition in order to protect your persons and property.
“In answer I am instructed to inform you that the offences of which you complain, are violations of the laws of the state of , and not of the laws of the . The powers of the President under the Constitution and laws, to direct the employment of a military force in cases, where the ordinary civil authorities authority is found insufficient, extend only to proceedings under the laws of the .
“Where an insurrection in any state exists, against the government thereof, the President is required on the [p. 475]
houses, or many of them. Our people had about one hundred and seventy buildings in , and a bonfire of nearly all of them at once, must have made a light large enough to have glared on the dark deed and cup of iniquity running over, at midnight.
“The crisis has come. All who will not take up arms with the mob and prepare to fight the “Mormons,” have to leave . I understand some have left the county because they refused to fight an innocent people. It is said the mob will hold a “general muster” this week for the purpose of learning who is who. They begin to slip over the and commit small depredations upon our brethren settled near the river, as we have reason to believe.
“It is said to be enough to shock the stoutest heart to witness the drinking swearing, and ravings of most of the mob; nothing but the power of God can stop them in their Latter Day crusade against the .
Our brethren are very industrious in putting in spring crops; and they are generally in good health, and the faithful, in strong faith of a glorious hereafter.
I remain yours &c.— .”
2 May 1834 • Friday
All hopes of relief from the general government was destroyed on receipt of the following communication from the City of
“War Department, May 2d. 1834,”
“Gentlemen, The President has referred to this department the memorial and letter addressed to him by yourselves and other citizens of , requesting his interposition in order to protect your persons and property.
“In answer I am instructed to inform you that the offences of which you complain, are violations of the laws of the state of , and not of the laws of the . The powers of the President under the Constitution and laws, to direct the employment of a military force in cases, where the ordinary civil authority is found insufficient, extend only to proceedings under the laws of the .
“Where an insurrection in any state exists, against the government thereof, the President is required on the [p. 475]
Page 475