History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 240
image
not only unspotted, but unsuspected.
5. Never write what you would be ashamed  to have printed; or, what might offend the chast est ear, or hurt the Softest heart. Write what  you are willing should be published in this  world and the world to come. Let the disciples of Christ  and the whole world, follow this rule, then the   would be kept, and no one  would write a word against the Lord his God;  against his father or mother; against his neigh bor, or. any against any of the creatures of God. No  one would need writi a word against ought  but sin; and then the world would be worth  living in, for there would be none to offend.”

September–November 1832

I continued the translations, and ministering  to the , through the fall, excepting a rapid  journey to Albany, , and , in com pany with , from which I returned  on the Sixth of September November, immediately after the  birth of my son, . <Note A addenda page 2> In answer  to Letters received from the brethren in  I wrote as follows;
Nov. 27th 1832.
Brother , I say brother, because  I feel so from the heart, and although it it is not long  since I wrote a letter unto you, yet I feel as though  you would excuse me for writing this, as I have many  things which I wish to communicate; some things which  I wish will to mention in this letter, which are laying with great  weight upon my mind. I am well, and my family also.  God grant that you may enjoy the same, & yours and all  the brethren and sisters who remember to enquire after  the commandments of the Lord, and the welfare of  Zion and such a being as me: and while I dictate this  letter I fancy myself that you are saying or thinking some thing similar to these words; My God, great and mighty  art thou, therefore shew unto thy servant what shall  become of all those who are assaying to come up unto  Zion, in order to keep the commandments of God, and  yet receive not their by , by order or [p. 240]
not only unspotted, but unsuspected.
5. Never write what you would be ashamed to have printed; or, what might offend the chastest ear, or hurt the Softest heart. Write what you are willing should be published in this world and the world to come. Let the disciples of Christ and the whole world, follow this rule, then the would be kept, and no one would write a word against the Lord his God; against his father or mother; against his neighbor, or. against any of the creatures of God. No one would need writi a word against ought but sin; and then the world would be worth living in, for there would be none to offend.”

September–November 1832

I continued the translations, and ministering to the , through the fall, excepting a rapid journey to Albany, , and , in company with , from which I returned on the Sixth of November, immediately after the birth of my son, . Note A addenda page 2 In answer to Letters received from the brethren in I wrote as follows;
Nov. 27th 1832.
Brother , I say brother, because I feel so from the heart, and although it is not long since I wrote a letter unto you, yet I feel as though you would excuse me for writing this, as I have many things which I wish to communicate; some things which I will mention in this letter, which are laying with great weight upon my mind. I am well, and my family also. God grant that you may enjoy the same, & yours and all the brethren and sisters who remember to enquire after the commandments of the Lord, and the welfare of Zion and such a being as me: and while I dictate this letter I fancy myself that you are saying or thinking something similar to these words; My God, great and mighty art thou, therefore shew unto thy servant what shall become of all those who are assaying to come up unto Zion, in order to keep the commandments of God, and yet receive not their by , by order or [p. 240]
Page 240