History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 480
image
to receive your reply. We would further remark, that under existing circumstances, we hope to receive our arms on this side of the , and we would name a place near one of the ferries for your convenience, As the arms are few in number, we request that they may be delivered with as little delay as possible.
Respectfully yours
(Signed) .
, , , .
P.S. We will thank you for a written communication, in answer to this letter, and the accompanying order,” [HC 1:492]
We forded the Miami River with our baggage waggons and <most of> the men waded through the water. (<addenda> no. 2 page 7)
On Saturday the 17th. of May we crossed the state line of , and encamped for the sabbath just within the limits of Indiana, having travelled <about> forty miles that day; Our feet were very sore and blistered, our stockings wet with blood, the weather being very warm. This <At> night one <of> our enemies spies <a spy> attempted to get into our camp, but was prevented by our guards. We had our sentinels <posted> every night on account of spies who were continually striving to harass us.— <by attempting to steal our horses &c> Note G Addenda page 4 [HC 2:68]
About this time The saints in , Missouri, established an armory, where they commenced manufacturing Swords, dirks, & pistols, stocking rifles, and repairing arms in general for their own defence against mob violence: Many arms were purchased, for the leading men in rendered every facility in their power, in order, as they said “to help the mormons settle their own difficulties, and pay the Mob in their own way.”
18–21 May 1834 • Sunday–Wednesday
Sunday 18th. We had preaching as usual and the administration of the . Monday 19th . <Travelled 31 miles and encamped in Franklin township, Henry county> <we encamped in an open place in the Beech Woods. On Tuesday 20th we encamped near Greenfield having travelled about 25 miles, some part of the way being so Bad, I waded over the tops of my boots in mud, and helped to pull thro the waggons with ropes (Note 3 page 7)> [HC 2:69] Although threatened by our enemies that we should not, we passed through Vandalia quietly and <Indianapolis on the 21st> unmolested; all the inhabitants were silent <quiet>. & appeared as though possessed with fear. At night we encamped on an eminence where we lost one horse, <a few miles west of Indianapolis. <Since the 18th. We had followed the National road where it was passable, frequently we had to take bye roads which were miry and led through thick woods.> There had previously been so many reports that we should never be permitted to pass thro’ that place, and that the would have us broken up, <dispersed> that some of the brethren were afraid we might have a difficulty there, but I <had> told them in the name of the Lord, we should not be disturbed and that>
<No. 4 Addenda page 8> [p. 480]
to receive your reply. We would further remark, that under existing circumstances, we hope to receive our arms on this side of the , and we would name a place near one of the ferries for your convenience, As the arms are few in number, we request that they may be delivered with as little delay as possible.
Respectfully yours
(Signed) .
, , , .
P.S. We will thank you for a written communication, in answer to this letter, and the accompanying order,” [HC 1:492]
We forded the Miami River with our baggage waggons and most of the men waded through the water. (addenda no. 2 page 7)
Saturday 17th. we crossed the state line of , and encamped for the sabbath just within the limits of Indiana, having travelled about forty miles that day; Our feet were very sore and blistered, our stockings wet with blood, the weather being very warm. At night a spy attempted to get into our camp, but was prevented by our guards. We had our sentinels posted every night on account of spies who were continually striving to harass us.— steal our horses &c Note G Addenda page 4 [HC 2:68]
The saints in , Missouri, established an armory, where they commenced manufacturing Swords, dirks, & pistols, stocking rifles, and repairing arms in general for their own defence against mob violence: Many arms were purchased, for the leading men in rendered every facility in their power, in order, as they said “to help the mormons settle their own difficulties, and pay the Mob in their own way.”
18–21 May 1834 • Sunday–Wednesday
We had preaching as usual and the administration of the . Monday 19th . Travelled 31 miles and encamped in Franklin township, Henry county in the Beech Woods. On Tuesday 20th we encamped near Greenfield having travelled about 25 miles, some part of the way being so Bad, I waded over the tops of my boots in mud, and helped to pull thro the waggons with ropes (Note 3 page 7) [HC 2:69] Although threatened by our enemies that we should not, we passed through Indianapolis on the 21st unmolested; all the inhabitants were quiet. At night we encamped a few miles west of Indianapolis. Since the 18th. We had followed the National road where it was passable, frequently we had to take bye roads which were miry and led through thick woods. There had previously been so many reports that we should never be permitted to pass thro’ that place, and that the would have us , dispersed that some of the brethren were afraid we might have difficulty there, but I had told them in the name of the Lord, we should not be disturbed and that
No. 4 Addenda page 8 [p. 480]
Page 480