History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 484
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, and gave vent to his feelings against myself in particular. <Note J addenda page 5> This was the first outbreak of importance which had occurred to mar our peace since we commenced the journey. [HC 2:83] While we were crossing The Mississippi River the brethren <> in wrote as follows:
.— June 5th. 1834”
“Dear Sir,
“We think the time is just at hand when our Society will be be glad to avail themselves of the protection of a military guard, that they may return to . We do not now know the precise day, but gives his opinion that there would be no impropriety in petitioning your Excellency for an order on the commanding officer to be sent by return mail that we might have it in our hands to present when our people were ready to start. If this should meet your approbation, and the order sent by return mail. We think it would be of great convenience to our society.
We would also be obliged to your Excellency for information concerning the necessary expences of ferriage &c. Are our people bound to pay their ferriage on their return? As they have already sustained heavy losses, and many of them lost their all, a mitigation of expences on their return at this time, where they could legally be reduced, would afford great relief; not only ferriage across, the , but other items of expence that could lawfully be reduced. We remain your Excellency’s Most obt. Servts.
, , “&c”
6 June 1834 • Friday
“From the Enquirer”
“Copy of a letter from . Governor of the State of . To Col J. Thornton. Dated “City of Jefferson, June 6th, 1834. Dear Sir,— I was pleased at the reception <receipt> of your letter, concurred in by Messrs, , and , on the subject of the Mormon difficulties. I should be gratified indeed if the parties could com[HC 2:84]promise on the terms you suggest, or, indeed, upon any other terms satisfactory [p. 484]
, and gave vent to his feelings against myself in particular. Note J addenda page 5 [HC 2:83] The in wrote as follows:
.— June 5th. 1834”
“Dear Sir,
“We think the time is just at hand when our Society will be be glad to avail themselves of the protection of a military guard, that they may return to . We do not now know the precise day, but gives his opinion that there would be no impropriety in petitioning your Excellency for an order on the commanding officer to be sent by return mail that we might have it in our hands to present when our people were ready to start. If this should meet your approbation, and the order sent by return mail. We think it would be of great convenience to our society.
We would also be obliged to your Excellency for information concerning the necessary expences of ferriage &c. Are our people bound to pay their ferriage on their return? As they have already sustained heavy losses, and many of them lost their all, a mitigation of expences on their return at this time, where they could legally be reduced, would afford great relief; not only ferriage across, the , but other items of expence that could lawfully be reduced. We remain your Excellency’s Most obt. Servts.
, , “&c”
6 June 1834 • Friday
“From the Enquirer”
“Copy of a letter from . Governor of the State of . To Col J. Thornton. Dated “City of Jefferson, June 6th, 1834. Dear Sir,— I was pleased at the receipt of your letter, concurred in by Messrs, , and , on the subject of the Mormon difficulties. I should be gratified indeed if the parties could com[HC 2:84]promise on the terms you suggest, or, indeed, upon any other terms satisfactory [p. 484]
Page 484