History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 474
in this , to return to our homes, in company with our friends, under guard, and when once in legal possession of our homes in , we shall endeavor to take care of them, without further wearying the patience of our worthy Chief Magistrate,— We will write hereafter, or send an express;— during the intermediate time, we would be glad to hear of the prospect of recovering our arms.
“With due respect, we are Sir, your obedient Servants,
(Signed) , , , , ,
P. S, Many of our brethren who are expected on, had made [HC 1:490] arrangements to emigrate to this , before the outrages of the mob last fall. We hope the painful emergency of our case, will plead an excuse for our frequent communications.”
About the last of this month I received by letters from friends in the east, and of Brethren in &c, the sum of two hundred and fifty one dollars, and sixty cents towards the .
1 May 1834 • Thursday
May 1st. 1834. More than twenty of the brethren left for , according to previous appointment, accompanied by four baggage waggons, They travelled to and there tarried with the , until the remainder of the company arrived, who were not in readiness to start with them.
The following letter from to the us clearly shows the necessity there was of the Saints in recieving assistance from afar
, May 1st 1834.”
Dear Brethren, There are great moves in the west, Last week an alarm was spread in , the seat of iniquity and bloodshed, that the “Mormons” were crossing the , to take possession of their lands, and nearly all the county turned out, “prepared for war;” on Saturday and on Sunday took the field, near Old McGees, above Blue: but no Mormons came; neither did Arthur go over to [HC 2:61] see about his Spilt whiskey, so that the scene closed by burning our [p. 474]
in this , to return to our homes, in company with our friends, under guard, and when once in legal possession of our homes in , we shall endeavor to take care of them, without further wearying the patience of our worthy Chief Magistrate,— We will write hereafter, or send an express;— during the intermediate time, we would be glad to hear of the prospect of recovering our arms.
“With due respect, we are Sir, your obedient Servants,
(Signed) , , , , ,
P. S, Many of our brethren who are expected on, had made [HC 1:490] arrangements to emigrate to this , before the outrages of the mob last fall. We hope the painful emergency of our case, will plead an excuse for our frequent communications.”
About the last of this month I received by letters from friends in the east, and of Brethren in &c, the sum of two hundred and fifty one dollars, and sixty cents towards the .
1 May 1834 • Thursday
May 1st. 1834. More than twenty of the brethren left for , according to previous appointment, accompanied by four baggage waggons, They travelled to and there tarried with the , until the remainder of the company arrived, who were not in readiness to start with them.
The following letter from to us clearly shows the necessity there was of the Saints in recieving assistance from afar
, May 1st 1834.”
Dear Brethren, There are great moves in the west, Last week an alarm was spread in , the seat of iniquity and bloodshed, that the “Mormons” were crossing the , to take possession of their lands, and nearly all the county turned out, “prepared for war;” on Saturday and on Sunday took the field, near Old McGees, above Blue: but no Mormons came; neither did Arthur go over to [HC 2:61] see about his Spilt whiskey, so that the scene closed by burning our [p. 474]
Page 474