History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 505
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, , , , .”
24 June 1834 • Tuesday
June 24th. we resumed our march for . Clay county by a circuitous route round the heads of to avoid the deep water. When within five or six miles of we were met by General Atchison and other gentlemen who desired us not to go to , because the feelings of the people were so much enraged against us. At their solicitations we turned our course, wheeled to the left, and crossing the prairie and woodland came to bro s’ residence, and encamped on the bank of , in brother Burghart’s <Burket> field.
This night the cholera burst forth upon us, and about Midnight it was manifest in its most terrific form. The Our ears were saluted with cries and mournings, and lamentations on every hand: even those on guard fell to the earth with their guns in their hands, so sudden <and powerful> was the attack. of this terrible disease. At the commencement I attempted to for their recovery, but I quickly learned by painful experience that when the Great Jehovah decrees destruction upon any people, <and> makes known his determination, man must not attempt to stay his hand. The moment I attempted to rebuke the disease, that moment I was attacked, <it seized upon me like the talons of a hawk, and <I said to the brethren> if I had my work done, you have had to tumble me into the ground without a coffin> and had I not desisted. I must have saved the life of my brother by the sacrifice of my own, for when I rebuked the disease it left him and seized me.
25 June 1834 • Wednesday
Early on the morning of the 25. the was separated into several small bands, and dispersed among the brethren living in the vicinity, and I wrote and sent by express, to “Messrs Thornton, & ,” as follows
, Clay Co. June 25th.
“Gent, Our company of men advanced yesterday from their encampment beyond to , where their tents are again pitched. But feeling disposed to adopt every pacific measure that can be done, without jeopardizing their our lives, to quiet the prejudices and fears of some part of the citizens of this , we have concluded that our [HC 2:114] company shall be immediately dispersed and continue so till every effort for an adjustment of differences between us and the people of has been made [p. 505]
, , , , .”
24 June 1834 • Tuesday
June 24th. we resumed our march for . Clay county by a circuitous route round the heads of to avoid the deep water. When within five or six miles of we were met by General Atchison and other gentlemen who desired us not to go to , because the feelings of the people were so much enraged against us. At their solicitations we turned our course, wheeled to the left, and crossing the prairie and woodland came to bro s’ residence, and encamped on the bank of , in brother Burket field.
This night the cholera burst forth upon us, and about Midnight it was manifest in its most terrific form. Our ears were saluted with cries and mournings, and lamentations on every hand: even those on guard fell to the earth with their guns in their hands, so sudden and powerful was the attack. of this terrible disease. At the commencement I attempted to for their recovery, but I quickly learned by painful experience that when the Great Jehovah decrees destruction upon any people, and makes known his determination, man must not attempt to stay his hand. The moment I attempted to rebuke the disease, I was attacked, it seized upon me like the talons of a hawk, and I said to the brethren if I had my work done, you have had to tumble me into the ground without a coffin and had I not desisted. I must have saved the life of my brother by the sacrifice of my own, .
25 June 1834 • Wednesday
Early on the morning of the 25. the was separated into small bands, and dispersed among the brethren living in the vicinity, and I wrote and sent by express, to “Messrs Thornton, & ,” as follows
, Clay Co. June 25th.
“Gent, Our company of men advanced yesterday from their encampment beyond to , where their tents are again pitched. But feeling disposed to adopt every pacific measure that can be done, without jeopardizing our lives, to quiet the prejudices and fears of some part of the citizens of this , we have concluded that our [HC 2:114] company shall be immediately dispersed and continue so till every effort for an adjustment of differences between us and the people of has been made [p. 505]
Page 505