History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 442
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with me from the 16th. of January 1833, till the  October following. While we were together we about one hundred and thirty.— Brethren pray  for me that I may have words of wisdom, and a  door of utterance to declare the whole council of God,  and rightly divide the word of truth; giving to  every man his portion in due season: For my de termination is, with the stick of Joseph in one hand,  and the stick of Judah in the other, to labor dil igently in this world, that my skirts may be clear  from the blood of all men, and I stand acquitted  before the bar of God. I am yours in Christ,”
(signed) “.”

27 February 1834 • Thursday

Thus while the press was mourning, the work prospering,  the saints rejoicing in the east. Troubles changed and  multiplied in the west, as may be seen by the  following letter written,
, Mo, February 27. 1834.
Dear Brethren, The times are so big with perten tuous events, and the anxiety of every body so  great to watch them, that I feel somewhat impress ed to write oftener than I have done, in order  to give you more of the “strange acts,” of this region.  I have just returned from , the seat  of war in the west. About a dozen of our brethren  among whom were ,  and myself, were subpoenaed in behalf of the state,  and on the 23rd of February, about twelve o’clock, we  were on the bank of opposite Everett’s Ferry, where  we found Captain, Atchison’s company of “Liberty  Blues” near fifty rank and file, ready to guard us  into . The soldiers were well  armed with muskets, bayonets fixed,  &c, and to me the scene was “passing strange,” and  long to be remembered. The martial law in  force to guard the civil. About twenty five men  crossed over to effect a landing in Safety, and  When they came near the ware-house, they fired  six or eight guns, though the enemy had not gath ered to witness the landing. [p. 442]
with me from the 16th. of January 1833, till the October following. While we were together we about one hundred and thirty.— Brethren pray for me that I may have words of wisdom, and a door of utterance to declare the whole council of God, and rightly divide the word of truth; giving to every man his portion in due season: For my determination is, with the stick of Joseph in one hand, and the stick of Judah in the other, to labor diligently in this world, that my skirts may be clear from the blood of all men, and I stand acquitted before the bar of God. I am yours in Christ,”
(signed) “.”

27 February 1834 • Thursday

Thus while the press was mourning, the work prospering, the saints rejoicing in the east. Troubles changed and multiplied in the west, as may be seen by the following letter written,
, Mo, February 27. 1834.
Dear Brethren, The times are so big with events, and the anxiety of every body so great to watch them, that I feel somewhat impressed to write oftener than I have done, in order to give you more of the “strange acts,” of this region. I have just returned from , the seat of war in the west. About a dozen of our brethren among whom were , and myself, were subpoenaed in behalf of the state, and on the 23rd of February, about twelve o’clock, we were on the bank opposite Everett’s Ferry, where we found Captain, Atchison’s company of “Liberty Blues” near fifty rank and file, ready to guard us into . The soldiers were well armed with muskets, bayonets fixed, &c, and to me the scene was “passing strange,” and long to be remembered. The martial law in force to guard the civil. About twenty five men crossed over to effect a landing in Safety, and When they came near the ware-house, they fired six or eight guns, though the enemy had not gathered to witness the landing. [p. 442]
Page 442