History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 443
image
After we were all across, and waiting for the  baggage waggon, it was thought most advisable to en camp in the woods, and the witnesses with half the  company, marched nearly a mile towards  , to build night fires, as we were without tents, and  the weather cold enough to snow a little. While on the  way, the Quarter Master, and others, that had gone on  ahead to prepare quarters in town, sent an express  back, which was not <of> the most pacific appearance. Capt  Atchison continued the Express to Colonel Allen for  the two hundred drafted militia, and also to  for more ammunition; and the night passed off in  warlike style; with the sentinels marching silently  at a proper distance from the watch fires.
Early in the morning, we marched, strongly  guarded by the troops, to the seat of war, and quar tered in the block house, formerly the tavern stand  of S. Flournoy. After breakfast, we were visited  by the district attorney, , and the Attorney  General, Mr Wells. From them we learned that  all hopes of criminal prosecution, was at an end.  Mr Wells had <been> sent by the to investigate, as far as  possible, the outrage, but the bold front of  the mob, (bound even unto death, (as I have heard,) was  not to be penetrated by civil law, or awed by executive  influence. Shortly after Captain Aitchison informed me  that he had just received an order from the Judge,  that his company’s service was no longer wanted in  , and we were marched out of town  to the tune of Yankee-doodle in quick time, and soon  returned to our camp without the loss of any lives.” (This  order was issued by the court, apparently, on account of the  speedy gathering of the old mob, or citizens of , and their assuming such a boisterous and  Mobocratic appearance.)” In fact much credit is due  to Captain Aitchison for his gallantry and hospitality,  and I think I can say of the officers and company,  that their conduct as soldiers and men. is highly  reputable; so much so, knowing as I do, the fatal result, [p. 443]
After we were all across, and waiting for the baggage waggon, it was thought most advisable to encamp in the woods, and the witnesses with half the company, marched nearly a mile towards , to build night fires, as we were without tents, and the weather cold enough to snow a little. While on the way, the Quarter Master, and others, that had gone on ahead to prepare quarters in town, sent an express back, which was not of the most pacific appearance. Capt Atchison continued the Express to Colonel Allen for the two hundred drafted militia, and also to for more ammunition; and the night passed off in warlike style; with the sentinels marching silently at a proper distance from the watch fires.
Early in the morning, we marched, strongly guarded by the troops, to the seat of war, and quartered in the block house, formerly the tavern stand of S. Flournoy. After breakfast, we were visited by the district attorney, , and the Attorney General, Mr Wells. From them we learned that all hopes of criminal prosecution, was at an end. Mr Wells had been sent by the to investigate, as far as possible, the outrage, but the bold front of the mob, (bound even unto death, (as I have heard,) was not to be penetrated by civil law, or awed by executive influence. Shortly after Captain Aitchison informed me that he had just received an order from the Judge, that his company’s service was no longer wanted in , and we were marched out of town to the tune of Yankee-doodle in quick time, and soon returned to our camp without the loss of any lives.” (This order was issued by the court, apparently, on account of the speedy gathering of the old mob, or citizens of , and their assuming such a boisterous and Mobocratic appearance.)” In fact much credit is due to Captain Aitchison for his gallantry and hospitality, and I think I can say of the officers and company, that their conduct as soldiers and men. is highly reputable; so much so, knowing as I do, the fatal result, [p. 443]
Page 443