History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 495
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army so that their skins will not hold shucks before two days are passed.”
They went to the Ferry and undertook to cross the , [HC 2:99] after dusk, and the angel of God saw fit to sink the boat, about the middle of the river, and seven out of twelve that attempted to cross, were drowned. Thus suddenly, and justly went they to their own place by water. Campbell was among the missng. He floated down the river some four or five miles, and lodged upon a pile of drift wood, where the Eagles and Buzzards, ravens, crows and wild animals eat his flesh from his bones, to fulfil his own words, and left him a horrible looking skeleton of God’s vengeance; which was discovered about three weeks after by one Mr Purtle.
Owens saved his life only, after floating four<teen> miles down stream, where he lodged upon an island, “swam off naked about day light, borrowed a mantle to hide his shame, and slipped home rather shy of the vengeance of God.”
19 June 1834 • Thursday
We were threatened that we should not pass through , and It was reported that an army lay in wait there to intercept us. Thursday 19th. we passed through the town as soon as it was light and before the inhabitants were up arisen from slumbers, meeting with no opposition, but we had not proceeded many miles before one waggon broke down, and by the time that was repaired wheels run off from others and such like incidents continued through the day to impede our progress; When we started in the morning we intended to arrive in that day, but in vain; At a seasonable hour we encamped on an elevated piece of ground between the two branches of , having travel[ed] only about 15 miles. , at this point, was composed of seven small streams, and those betwixt which we encamped were two of them. <(Note 15 page 14)> [HC 2:100] [HC 2:101] [HC 2:102]
* As we halted and were making preparations for the night, five men <armed with guns,> rode into our and told us we should “see hell before morning;” and their accompanying oaths partook of all the malice of demons. They told us that sixty men were coming from , Ray county; and seventy more from , <to join the mob who had> sworn to our utter destruction. The weather was pleasant. at this time. <as was taking his bedding out of the waggon he discovered a large Rattle Snake, which he had carried with him all day.> [p. 495]
army so that their skins will not hold shucks before two days are passed.”
They went to the Ferry and undertook to cross the , [HC 2:99] after dusk, and the angel of God saw fit to sink the boat, about the middle of the river, and seven out of twelve that attempted to cross, were drowned. Thus suddenly, and justly went they to their own place by water. Campbell was among the missng. He floated down the river some four or five miles, and lodged upon a pile of drift wood, where the Eagles and Buzzards, ravens, crows and wild animals eat his flesh from his bones, to fulfil his own words, and left him a horrible looking skeleton of God’s vengeance; which was discovered about three weeks after by one Mr Purtle.
Owens saved his life only, after floating fourteen miles down stream, where he lodged upon an island, “swam off naked about day light, borrowed a mantle to hide his shame, and slipped home rather shy of the vengeance of God.”
19 June 1834 • Thursday
(Note 15 page 14) [HC 2:100] [HC 2:101] [HC 2:102]
* As we halted and were making preparations for the night, five men armed with guns, rode into our and told us we should “see hell before morning;” and their accompanying oaths partook of all the malice of demons. They told us that sixty men were coming from , Ray county; and seventy more from , to join the mob who had sworn our utter destruction. The weather was pleasant. . as was taking his bedding out of the waggon he discovered a large Rattle Snake, which he had carried with him all day. [p. 495]
Page 495