History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 385
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of this week. In this distressed situation, in  behalf of my brethren I pray your Excellency to await  a further communication, which will soon follow this,  setting forth among other things the the importance of  our people being restored to their possessions that they  might may have an equal chance with their enemies in  producing important testimony before the court, which  the enemy are now determined to deprive them of.  Trusting that your excellency will perceive the agitation  and consternation that must necessarily prevail among  most of our people at this day, from the unparallelled  us usage they have received, and may many of them wander ing at this time destitute of shelter.
An immediate court of enquiry called while our  people are thus situated, would give our enemies a  decided advantage in point of testimony, while they  are in possession of their own homes, and ours also;  with no enemy in the to molest or make them  afraid.
Very Respectfully, Your obt Servt., .
To his Excellency. , , Mo—.”
“I have seen and read the above letter, and on  reflection, I concur entirely in the opinion therein expressed.  I also think that at the next regular term of the Court,  an examination of the criminal matter cannot be  gone into, without a guard for the court and Witnesses.
(Signed)
Those who were threatened by the mob, on Sunday  the 24th. fled into , and encamped on  the bank of the . A number of the  families went into Van Beuren County; Their whole  number of men women and children, being  upwards of one hundred and fifty.

1–4 December 1833 • Sunday–Wednesday

About the first of December and   arrived at with a new press  and Type, and on the fourth commenced distrib uting the type.

5 December 1833 • Thursday

The next day I wrote to ,  clay county, Missouri, the following,
December 5th 1833
Dear Brethren, We have Just received a letter [p. 385]
of this week. In this distressed situation, in behalf of my brethren I pray your Excellency to await a further communication, which will soon follow this, setting forth among other things the importance of our people being restored to their possessions that they may have an equal chance with their enemies in producing important testimony before the court, which the enemy are now determined to deprive them of. Trusting that your excellency will perceive the agitation and consternation that must necessarily prevail among most of our people at this day, from the unparallelled usage they have received, and many of them wandering at this time destitute of shelter.
An immediate court of enquiry called while our people are thus situated, would give our enemies a decided advantage in point of testimony, while they are in possession of their own homes, and ours also; with no enemy in the to molest or make them afraid.
Very Respectfully, Your obt Servt., .
To his Excellency. , , Mo—.”
“I have seen and read the above letter, and on reflection, I concur entirely in the opinion therein expressed. I also think that at the next regular term of the Court, an examination of the criminal matter cannot be gone into, without a guard for the court and Witnesses.
(Signed)
Those who were threatened by the mob, on Sunday the 24th. fled into , and encamped on the bank of the . A number of the families went into Van Beuren County; Their whole number of men women and children, being upwards of one hundred and fifty.

1–4 December 1833 • Sunday–Wednesday

About the first of December and arrived at with a new press and Type, and on the fourth commenced distributing the type.

5 December 1833 • Thursday

The next day I wrote to , clay county, Missouri, the following,
December 5th 1833
Dear Brethren, We have Just received a letter [p. 385]
Page 385