History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 274
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as follows;
To , ,
Dear Sir, I was somewhat disappointed  on receiving my paper with only a part of my  letter inserted in it. The letter which I wrote you  for publication I wrote by the  of God, and I am quite anxious to have it all  laid before the public for it is of importance to  them: but I have no claim upon you, neither  do I wish to urge you, beyond that which is  reasonable, to do it. I have only to appeal to  your I extended generosity to all religious societies  that claim that Christ has come in the flesh;  and also tell you what will be the consequence  of a neglect to publish it.
Some parts of the letter were very severe  upon the wickedness of Sectarianism, I acknowl edge; and the truth, remember, is hard and severe  against all iniquity and wickedness, but this  is no reason why it should not be published,  but the very reason why it should. I lay the  ax at the root of the tree, and I long to see many  of the sturdy oaks, which have long cumbered the  ground, fall prostrate. I now say unto you,  that if you wish to clear your garments, from  the blood of your readers, I exhort you to pub lish that letter entire; but if not the Sin be  upon your head. Accept, Sir, the good wishes  and tender regard of your unworthy servant.
Joseph Smith. Junr.

13 February 1833 • Wednesday

February 13th. A of assem bled to investigate the proceedings of Bro ,  who was accused of not magnifying his calling as  a high priest, but had been guilty of neglect of duty, of  abusing the , and of treating their admonitions  with contempt. After the council had considered  the case, agreed to make satisfaction,  but did not shew much humility.

15 February 1833 • Friday

February 15th.; in a council, I ordained and , elders. [p. 274]
as follows;
To , ,
Dear Sir, I was somewhat disappointed on receiving my paper with only a part of my letter inserted in it. The letter which I wrote you for publication I wrote by the of God, and I am quite anxious to have it all laid before the public for it is of importance to them: but I have no claim upon you, neither do I wish to urge you, beyond that which is reasonable, to do it. I have only to appeal to your extended generosity to all religious societies that claim that Christ has come in the flesh; and also tell you what will be the consequence of a neglect to publish it.
Some parts of the letter were very severe upon the wickedness of Sectarianism, I acknowledge; and the truth, remember, is hard and severe against all iniquity and wickedness, but this is no reason why it should not be published, but the very reason why it should. I lay the ax at the root of the tree, and I long to see many of the sturdy oaks, which have long cumbered the ground, fall prostrate. I now say unto you, that if you wish to clear your garments, from the blood of your readers, I exhort you to publish that letter entire; but if not the Sin be upon your head. Accept, Sir, the good wishes and tender regard of your unworthy servant.
Joseph Smith. Junr.

13 February 1833 • Wednesday

February 13th. A of assembled to investigate the proceedings of Bro , who was accused of not magnifying his calling as a high priest, but had been guilty of neglect of duty, of abusing the , and of treating their admonitions with contempt. After the council had considered the case, agreed to make satisfaction, but did not shew much humility.

15 February 1833 • Friday

February 15th.; in a council, I ordained and , elders. [p. 274]
Page 274