History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 498
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to procure our destruction. When I had closed a lengthy  speech, the spirit of which melted them into compassion,  they arose and offered me their hands, and said  they would use their influence to allay the excitement  which every where prevailed against us, and they  wept when they heard of our afflictions and persecutions,  and that our intentions were good. Accordingly  they went forth and rode among the people, and made  unwearied exertions to allay the Excitement.
<Bro. and are sick with the Cholera, Thos. Hayes was taken today (see 502*)>
The brethren in wrote the committee  of the <mob>— the same day,
21st June, 1834.
“Gentlemen,— Your propostions of monday last have been  generally made known to our people, and we are in structed to inform you that they cannot be acceeded to.
Honorable propositions to you are now making on  our part and we think we shall be enabled to  deliver the same to you the early part of next week.  We are happy to have it our power to give you assur ances that our brethren here, together with those who  have arrived from the East, are unanimously disposed  to make every sacrifice for an honorable adjustment  of our differences that could be required of free-Citizens  of the .
Negociations at the are now going on between  some gentlemen of this and our brethren which  are calculated to allay the great excitement in your .  We are informed that the citizens of entertain  fears that our people intend to invade their territory  in a hostile manner. We assure you that their  fears are groundless such is not, and never was  our intention.
(Signed) , .  , ,
To S. C. Owen [Samuel Owens] and others of the Committee.”

22 June 1834 • Sunday

<Sunday> June 22. <Brother received a wound from the accidental discharge of a Horse Pistol from  which he recovered in about three days> , the sheriff of , came to the our camp to hold consultation with us. I march[ed]  my company into a grove near by and formed in a circle,  with in the centre. commenced by  saying that he had heard that Joseph <Smith> was in the camp,  and if so he would like to see him. I arose and replied [p. 498]
to procure our destruction. When I had closed a lengthy speech, the spirit of which melted them into compassion, they arose and offered me their hands, and said they would use their influence to allay the excitement which every where prevailed against us, and they wept when they heard of our afflictions and persecutions, and that our intentions were good. Accordingly they went forth among the people, and made unwearied exertions to allay the Excitement.
Bro. and are sick with the Cholera, Thos. Hayes was taken today (see 502*)
The brethren in wrote the committee of the mob— the same day,
21st June, 1834.
“Gentlemen,— Your propostions of monday last have been generally made known to our people, and we are instructed to inform you that they cannot be acceeded to.
Honorable propositions to you are now making on our part and we think we shall be enabled to deliver the same to you the early part of next week. We are happy to have it our power to give you assurances that our brethren here, together with those who have arrived from the East, are unanimously disposed to make every sacrifice for an honorable adjustment of our differences that could be required of free-Citizens of the .
Negociations at the are now going on between some gentlemen of this and our brethren which are calculated to allay the great excitement in your . We are informed that the citizens of entertain fears that our people intend to invade their territory in a hostile manner. We assure you that their fears are groundless such is not, and never was our intention.
(Signed) , . , ,
To S. C. Owen [Samuel Owens] and others of the Committee.”

22 June 1834 • Sunday

Sunday June 22. Brother received a wound from the accidental discharge of a Horse Pistol from which he recovered in about three days , the sheriff of , came to our camp to hold consultation with us. I marched my company into a grove near by and formed in a circle, with in the centre. commenced by saying that he had heard that Joseph Smith was in the camp, and if so he would like to see him. I arose and replied [p. 498]
Page 498