History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 355
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us to go with them a mile, we have gone with them twain;  we have borne the above outrages without murmuring:—  But we cannot patiently bear them any longer; according to  the laws of God and man we have borne enough. Believing  with all honorable men, that whenever that fatal hour shall  arrive that the poorest citizen’s person. property, or rights  and privileges shall be trampled upon by a lawless mob  with impunity, that moment, a dagger is plunged into the  heart of the Constitution, and the Union must tremble!  Assuring ourselves that no republican will suffer the  liberty of the press; the freedom of speech; and the liberty  of conscience, to be silenced by a mob, without raising  a helping hand, to save his country from disgrace. We  solicit assistance to obtain our rights; holding ourselves  amenable to the laws of our country whenever we trans gress them.
Knowing, as we do, that the threats of this mob, in most  cases, have been put into execution, and knowing also,  that every officer civil and military, with a very few ex ceptions, has pledged his life and honor, to force us from  the , dead or alive; and beleiving that civil pro cess cannot be served without the aid of the Executive ; and not wishing to have the blood of our defenseless  women and children to stain the land; which has once  been stained by the blood of our fathers to purchase our  liberty: we appeal to the for aid; asking him , by express proclamation, or otherwise, to raise a sufficient  number of troops, who, with us, may be empowered to  defend our rights, that we may sue for damages in the  loss of property,— for abuse— for defamation, as to ourselves—  and if advisable try for treason against the government;  that the law of the land may not be defied, nor nullified,  but peace restored to our country:—and we will ever pray.”
This petition was signed, by < &> nearly all the <members of the>  in . and was presented the

5–6 October 1833 • Saturday–Sunday

On the 5th. of October 1833. I started on a journey  east, and to , in company with and  , and arrived the same day at in ; and the day following, we the [p. 355]
us to go with them a mile, we have gone with them twain; we have borne the above outrages without murmuring:— But we cannot patiently bear them any longer; according to the laws of God and man we have borne enough. Believing with all honorable men, that whenever that fatal hour shall arrive that the poorest citizen’s person. property, or rights and privileges shall be trampled upon by a lawless mob with impunity, that moment, a dagger is plunged into the heart of the Constitution, and the Union must tremble! Assuring ourselves that no republican will suffer the liberty of the press; the freedom of speech; and the liberty of conscience, to be silenced by a mob, without raising a helping hand, to save his country from disgrace. We solicit assistance to obtain our rights; holding ourselves amenable to the laws of our country whenever we transgress them.
Knowing, as we do, that the threats of this mob, in most cases, have been put into execution, and knowing also, that every officer civil and military, with a very few exceptions, has pledged his life and honor, to force us from the , dead or alive; and beleiving that civil process cannot be served without the aid of the Executive; and not wishing to have the blood of our defenseless women and children to stain the land; which has once been stained by the blood of our fathers to purchase our liberty: we appeal to the for aid; asking him, by express proclamation, or otherwise, to raise a sufficient number of troops, who, with us, may be empowered to defend our rights, that we may sue for damages in the loss of property,— for abuse— for defamation, as to ourselves— and if advisable try for treason against the government; that the law of the land may not be defied, nor nullified, but peace restored to our country:—and we will ever pray.”
This petition was signed, by & nearly all the members of the in .

5–6 October 1833 • Saturday–Sunday

On the 5th. of October 1833. I started on a journey east, and to , in company with and , and arrived the same day at in ; and the day following, the [p. 355]
Page 355