History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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was in July of the same year while there he became acquain ted with Phebe Brooks to whom he was married on the  12th. of June A.D. 1820. She was a native of the state  of <Bridge Town Cumberland Co> and had previously removed to Trumball Co  Ohio After his marriage he continued to preach in that  district of Country until Novr. 1821 when he was requested  by the first Baptist Church of the City of to take  the pastoral charge of said church, which invitation  he accepted and in Feby A.D. 1822 he left Warren in  Trumball Co and removed to that City and immediately  entered upon his pastoral duties and continued to preach  to that church with considerable success. At the time  he commenced his labors in that church and for some time  before, the church was in a very low state and much con fusion existed in consequence of the conduct of their former  pastor. However soon after Elder commenced his  labours there was soon a plesing change effected, for by  his incessant labors and his peculiar style of preaching  the church was crowded with anxious listners. The number  of members rapidly encreased and it soon became one  of the most respectable churches in that City.
He was now a popular minister and was much respec ted in that City and all classes and persuasions sought  his society.
After he had been in that city some time his  mind was troubled and much perplexed with the idea  that the doctrines maintained by that Society were not  altogether in accordance with the scriptures. This thing  continued to agitate his mind more and more and his  reflections on these occasions were peculiarly trying.  For according to his views of the word of God, no other  Church that he was aquainted with was right or with  whom he could associate. Consequently if he was to dis avow the doctrine of the Church with whom he was  then associated, he knew of no other way of obtaining  a livlihood except by manual labor, and at that time  had a wife and three children to support.
On the one hand was, wealth, popularity & honor; on the  other <appeared> nothing but poverty and hard labour— [p. 63]
was in July of the same year while there he became acquainted with Phebe Brooks to whom he was married on the 12th. of June A.D. 1820. She was a native of the state of Bridge Town Cumberland Co and had previously removed to Trumball Co Ohio After his marriage he continued to preach in that district of Country until Novr. 1821 when he was requested by the first Baptist Church of the City of to take the pastoral charge of said church, which invitation he accepted and in Feby A.D. 1822 he left Warren in Trumball Co and removed to that City and immediately entered upon his pastoral duties and continued to preach to that church with considerable success. At the time he commenced his labors in that church and for some time before, the church was in a very low state and much confusion existed in consequence of the conduct of their former pastor. However soon after commenced his labours there was soon a plesing change effected, for by his incessant labors and his peculiar style of preaching the church was crowded with anxious listners. The number of members rapidly encreased and it soon became one of the most respectable churches in that City.
He was now a popular minister and was much respected in that City and all classes and persuasions sought his society.
After he had been in that city some time his mind was troubled and much perplexed with the idea that the doctrines maintained by that Society were not altogether in accordance with the scriptures. This thing continued to agitate his mind more and more and his reflections on these occasions were peculiarly trying. For according to his views of the word of God, no other Church that he was aquainted with was right or with whom he could associate. Consequently if he was to disavow the doctrine of the Church with whom he was then associated, he knew of no other way of obtaining a livlihood except by manual labor, and at that time had a wife and three children to support.
On the one hand was, wealth, popularity & honor; on the other appeared nothing but poverty and hard labour— [p. 63]
Page 63