History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1468
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<February 12> Christ would come.
13 February 1843 • Monday
<13>. came in early in the morning and gave a brief history of our second visit to , Missouri. I then read a while in German, and walked out in the with , returning at 12 oclock. brother John C. Annis called for Council— the called and informed me that Mr. Rollison was trying to get the Post Office and that Dr. was the first to sign the Petition. I gave instruction about a bond for a part of a lot to brother John Oakley— a ¼ before 4 went to the Printing Office with— I spent the evening at Elder ’s, in the course of conversation I remarked that those brethren who came here having money and purchased without the [HC 5:272] Church and without Counsel must be cut off— this with other observations aroused the feelings of brother Dixon from Salem, , who was then present, and he appeared in great wrath—
I received the following communication
“To the Hon. Mr. Bryant 2nd. Asst. P. M. General— We your petitioners respectfully beg leave to submit, that as an attempt is now by certain individuals being made to place the Post Office in this place into the hands of William H. Rollison a stranger in our place, and one whose conduct since he came here, has been such as to forbid our having confidence in him; and we do hope and pray both for ourselves and that of the public, that he may not receive the appointment of Post Master in Ills. but that the present Post Master may continue to hold the office—
Bro. J. Smith if the foregoing can have a number of respectable subscribers, I believe Rollison cannot get the Office— I should like to have it so as to send it out on Sunday’s Mail— Respy. .”
A letter from the Army dated at Fort Leavenworth, , states
“that on the 14th. of February, at 3 o clock A.M. the moon which had been obscured by a cloud for some hours, burst forth in a deep blood red color, with a black cross of equal proportions over the face, extending beyond the rim; while on the two sides small pieces of rainbow were visible. After continuing in this way for about an hour, the color of the moon changed to its ordinary hue, and the cross became a silvery white, with the edges extending beyond the rim, and touching the rainbows. It continued so for half an hour and heavy clouds then intervening obscured the moon, which set unseen.”
14 February 1843 • Tuesday
<14> Tuesday 14. Sent to , and by him deposited five hundred dollars with General [Samuel] Leach for Mr. [John] Walsh for land which lies between my and the , agreeable to my letter to — read proof of the Doctrine and Covenants with — read in German from 9 ½ to 11 forenoon— had the stove removed from the large room in my house into a small brick building which was erected for a , designing to use it for a Mayors Office until I could build a new one— had much conversation with and various individuals.
Sold a Cow.
15 February 1843 • Wednesday
<15> Wednesday 15 This morning I spent time in changing the top plate of the Office Stove which had been put together wrong: read a libellous letter in the Alton Telegraph written to of concerning , and the Ladies attending my late trial at . and published the following letter in the Times and Seasons— [HC 5:273]
Mr. Editor— Sir— Ever since I gave up the editorial department of the Times and Seasons, I have thought of writing of piece for—— publication, by way of valedictory, as is usual when editors resign the chair editorial. My principal remarks I intended to apply to the gentlemen of the quill, or if you please, that numerous body of respectable gentlemen who profess to regulate the tone of the public mind,in regard to politics, morality, religion, literature, the arts and sciences &c &c viz the editors of [p. 1468]
February 12 Christ would come.
13 February 1843 • Monday
13. came in early in the morning and gave a brief history of our second visit to , Missouri. I then read a while in German, and walked out in the with , returning at 12 oclock. brother John C. Annis called for Council— the called and informed me that Mr. Rollison was trying to get the Post Office and that Dr. was the first to sign the Petition. I gave instruction about a bond for a part of a lot to brother John Oakley— a ¼ before 4 went to the Printing Office with— I spent the evening at Elder ’s, in the course of conversation I remarked that those brethren who came here having money and purchased without the [HC 5:272] Church and without Counsel must be cut off— this with other observations aroused the feelings of brother Dixon from Salem, , who was then present, and he appeared in great wrath—
I received the following communication
“To the Hon. Mr. Bryant 2nd. Asst. P. M. General— We your petitioners respectfully beg leave to submit, that as an attempt is now by certain individuals being made to place the Post Office in this place into the hands of William H. Rollison a stranger in our place, and one whose conduct since he came here, has been such as to forbid our having confidence in him; and we do hope and pray both for ourselves and that of the public, that he may not receive the appointment of Post Master in Ills. but that the present Post Master may continue to hold the office—
Bro. J. Smith if the foregoing can have a number of respectable subscribers, I believe Rollison cannot get the Office— I should like to have it so as to send it out on Sunday’s Mail— Respy. .”
A letter from the Army dated at Fort Leavenworth, , states
“that on the 14th. of February, at 3 o clock A.M. the moon which had been obscured by a cloud for some hours, burst forth in a deep blood red color, with a black cross of equal proportions over the face, extending beyond the rim; while on the two sides small pieces of rainbow were visible. After continuing in this way for about an hour, the color of the moon changed to its ordinary hue, and the cross became a silvery white, with the edges extending beyond the rim, and touching the rainbows. It continued so for half an hour and heavy clouds then intervening obscured the moon, which set unseen.”
14 February 1843 • Tuesday
14 Tuesday 14. Sent to , and by him deposited five hundred dollars with General Samuel Leach for Mr. [John] Walsh for land which lies between my and the , agreeable to my letter to — read proof of the Doctrine and Covenants with — read in German from 9 ½ to 11 forenoon— had the stove removed from the large room in my house into a small brick building which was erected for a , designing to use it for a Mayors Office until I could build a new one— had much conversation with and various individuals.
Sold a Cow.
15 February 1843 • Wednesday
15 Wednesday 15 This morning I spent time in changing the top plate of the Office Stove which had been put together wrong: read a libellous letter in the Alton Telegraph written to of concerning , and the Ladies attending my late trial at . and published the following letter in the Times and Seasons— [HC 5:273]
Mr. Editor— Sir— Ever since I gave up the editorial department of the Times and Seasons, I have thought of writing of piece for—— publication, by way of valedictory, as is usual when editors resign the chair editorial. My principal remarks I intended to apply to the gentlemen of the quill, or if you please, that numerous body of respectable gentlemen who profess to regulate the tone of the public mind,in regard to politics, morality, religion, literature, the arts and sciences &c &c viz the editors of [p. 1468]
Page 1468