History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1368
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<August 14> toil of crossing to — they met with ’ skiff just about to go over to , they got into that Skiff and left to return at his own leisure. Before they could get over, the wind arose again considerabl<y>, but they arrived safe home about 6 o’clock <in the evening> where they found Mr. [Aaron] Powers from who had just returned from . While there he ascertained that there was no writ issue<d> in for me. [blank] The people enquired “if it was not true that Joseph had been commissioned by the to visit the Indians and negociate with them for a tract of land,” such being the report in circulation. Mr. Powers answered that he “was not authorized to assert that the report was [HC 5:95] true, but he thought it was not only possible but probable”— but in this Mr. Powers was mistaken.
15 August 1842 • Monday
<15> Monday 15. This forenoon several reports were in circulation in the , that the Militia are on their way here, and the same is said to have been stated by the Stage driver, but it is supposed that it is only a Scheme to alarm the Citizens. presented the foregoing letter to , to which he responded as follows,
, Illinois August 15th. afternoon, 1842— Lieutenant General Joseph Smith, Dear Friend. I this morning received a line from you, by the young man () respecting the Guns &c. One of them is in the Stone Shop by the . One I expect to get put into’ barn, and the other I cannot get under lock and key in any place I know of yet, but I will have them taken the best care of that I can. I have also received from the hand of your your orders at length, respecting matters and things and I am happy indeed to receive such orders from you, for your views on these subjects are precisely my own. I do respond with my whole heart to every sentiment you have so nobly and so feelingly expressed, and while my heart beats, or this hand which now writes, is able to draw and wield a sword, you may depend on it being at your service in the glorious cause of Liberty and Truth, ready in a moments warning to defend the rights of man both civil and religious. Our common rights and peace is all we ask, and we will use every peaceable means in our power to enjoy these, but our rights we must have, peace we must have, if we have to fight for them. There has nothing worthy of notice come to my knowledge to day, the Gentlemen Officers are seemingly very unhappy and out of humor with themselves more than with any body else, they see we have the advantage of them and that they cannot provoke us to break the law; and I think they know if they do that, we will use them up the right way. I guess they see that in our patience we possess our souls, and I know that if they shed or cause to be shed a drop of the blood of one of the least amongst us, that the lives of the transgressors shall atone for it with the help of our God— I send you the ordinance that was passed by the Court Martial on [HC 5:96] Saturday last for your approval or otherwise, as it cannot become a law without your approbation— I also send you the returns of the Election for Major General, as you ordered the Election, you will please order the War Secretary of the Legion () to send for a Commission With the warmest feelings of my heart I remain most respectfully yours— P. S. Afternoon 6 o’clock— I have just learned that Mr. Pittman got a letter about noon and got ready immediately and started off as he said for , but I think for giving it up for a bad job—
About dark returned from and stated that he had conversed [p. 1368]
August 14 toil of crossing to — they met with ’ skiff just about to go over to , they got into that Skiff and left to return at his own leisure. Before they could get over, the wind arose again considerably, but they arrived safe home about 6 o’clock in the evening where they found Mr. [Aaron] Powers from who had just returned from . While there he ascertained that there was no writ issued in for me. [blank] The people enquired “if it was not true that Joseph had been commissioned by the to visit the Indians and negociate with them for a tract of land,” such being the report in circulation. Mr. Powers answered that he “was not authorized to assert that the report was [HC 5:95] true, but he thought it was not only possible but probable”— but in this Mr. Powers was mistaken.
15 August 1842 • Monday
15 Monday 15. This forenoon several reports were in circulation in the , that the Militia are on their way here, and the same is said to have been stated by the Stage driver, but it is supposed that it is only a Scheme to alarm the Citizens. presented the foregoing letter to , to which he responded as follows,
, Illinois August 15th. afternoon, 1842— Lieutenant General Joseph Smith, Dear Friend. I this morning received a line from you, by the young man () respecting the Guns &c. One of them is in the Stone Shop by the . One I expect to get put into’ barn, and the other I cannot get under lock and key in any place I know of yet, but I will have them taken the best care of that I can. I have also received from the hand of your your orders at length, respecting matters and things and I am happy indeed to receive such orders from you, for your views on these subjects are precisely my own. I do respond with my whole heart to every sentiment you have so nobly and so feelingly expressed, and while my heart beats, or this hand which now writes, is able to draw and wield a sword, you may depend on it being at your service in the glorious cause of Liberty and Truth, ready in a moments warning to defend the rights of man both civil and religious. Our common rights and peace is all we ask, and we will use every peaceable means in our power to enjoy these, but our rights we must have, peace we must have, if we have to fight for them. There has nothing worthy of notice come to my knowledge to day, the Gentlemen Officers are seemingly very unhappy and out of humor with themselves more than with any body else, they see we have the advantage of them and that they cannot provoke us to break the law; and I think they know if they do that, we will use them up the right way. I guess they see that in our patience we possess our souls, and I know that if they shed or cause to be shed a drop of blood of one of the least amongst us, that the lives of the transgressors shall atone for it with the help of our God— I send you the ordinance that was passed by the Court Martial on [HC 5:96] Saturday last for your approval or otherwise, as it cannot become a law without your approbation— I also send you the returns of the Election for Major General, as you ordered the Election, you will please order the War Secretary of the Legion () to send for a Commission With the warmest feelings of my heart I remain most respectfully yours— — P. S. Afternoon 6 o’clock— I have just learned that Mr. Pittman got a letter about noon and got ready immediately and started off as he said for , but I think for giving it up for a bad job—
About dark returned from and stated that he had conversed [p. 1368]
Page 1368