History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1581
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<June 20> upon the rights of private companies, or even individuals, and attempts made with zeal and determination to carry them out to the extent.
If public confidence be restored, the work can go on more vigorous than ever. Respectfully, Prest. of the Company.”
Elder John Sni-der reported the names of various persons in Great Britain and Ireland, who donated various small sums between May and Decemr 1842 as contributions for building the , and paid over $975.04 the names of the donors and amounts are recorded in the Law of the Lord.
I insert the following as an exception to the universal rule. Earl Spencer keeps all the poor in the parish of Wormleighton, and so prevents a poor rate; he allows his laborers nine Shillings a week when out of employment, and they pay only a Shilling a year as a nominal rent for the house in which they severally reside.
21 June 1843 • Wednesday
<21> and left Portland at 4 a.m. and travelled to within 9 miles of , they changed their course and went direct to Inlet Grove where they arrived at 12½ took dinner and fed their horses, left Inlet at 2 p.m. and arrived at Wassons at 4 p.m. where they learned that I was gone to in the carriage, and altho their horses were tired down they started for , but met me about half way. They returned with me to Wassons and were glad to find a resting place having rode 212 miles in 66 hours and had very little rest on the way; the horses were tired, their backs very sore. I told them not to be alarmed, I have no fear, I shall not leave here, I shall find friends and Missourians can not hurt me. I tell you in the name of Israel’s God.
22 June 1843 • Thursday
<22> Another meeting of the Laborers in the near the concerning wages.
I had previously given out an appointment to preach this day at , but on account of the change in circumstances, I wrote to telling the people there was a writ out for me, and therefore declined preaching, and I kept myself quiet all day, telling my friends that if I started for home I might be arrested where I had no friends, and kidnapped into , and thought it best to tarry at Inlet and see the result; many were desirous to hear me preach but were disappointed.
Lawyer of , having heard of the Writ being out against me, rode 12 miles to inform me. I thanked him for his kindness, paid him $25.00, and introduced him to my friends and , shewing that I had received previous information—
23 June 1843 • Friday
<23> arrived at from .
At 8 a.m. a Company of the brethren <(a bee)> gathered to remove the timbers from the to the .
I sent to at 10 a.m. to try and find out what was going on there; he met Mr. the Sheriff of Missouri and Constable of , Illinois about half way, but they being disguised, they were not known by him, and when at they represented themselves as <Mormon> Elders of the church, who wanted to see the the Prophet. They hired a man [p. 1581]
June 20 upon the rights of private companies, or even individuals, and attempts made with zeal and determination to carry them out to the extent.
If public confidence be restored, the work can go on more vigorous than ever. Respectfully, Prest. of the Company.”
Elder John Sni-der reported the names of various persons in Great Britain and Ireland, who donated various small sums between May and Decemr 1842 as contributions for building the , and paid over $975.04 the names of the donors and amounts are recorded in the Law of the Lord.
I insert the following as an exception to the universal rule. Earl Spencer keeps all the poor in the parish of Wormleighton, and so prevents a poor rate; he allows his laborers nine Shillings a week when out of employment, and they pay only a Shilling a year as a nominal rent for the house in which they severally reside.
21 June 1843 • Wednesday
21 and left Portland at 4 a.m. and travelled to within 9 miles of , they changed their course and went direct to Inlet Grove where they arrived at 12½ took dinner and fed their horses, left Inlet at 2 p.m. and arrived at Wassons at 4 p.m. where they learned that I was gone to in the carriage, and altho their horses were tired down they started for , but met me about half way. They returned with me to Wassons and were glad to find a resting place having rode 212 miles in 66 hours and had very little rest on the way; the horses were tired, their backs very sore. I told them not to be alarmed, I have no fear, I shall not leave here, I shall find friends and Missourians can not hurt me. I tell you in the name of Israel’s God.
22 June 1843 • Thursday
22 Another meeting of the Laborers in the near the concerning wages.
I had previously given out an appointment to preach this day at , but on account of the change in circumstances, I wrote to telling the people there was a writ out for me, and therefore declined preaching, and I kept myself quiet all day, telling my friends that if I started for home I might be arrested where I had no friends, and kidnapped into , and thought it best to tarry at Inlet and see the result; many were desirous to hear me preach but were disappointed.
Lawyer of , having heard of the Writ being out against me, rode 12 miles to inform me. I thanked him for his kindness, paid him $25.00, and introduced him to my friends and , shewing that I had received previous information—
23 June 1843 • Friday
23 arrived at from .
At 8 a.m. a Company of the brethren (a bee) gathered to remove the timbers from the to the .
I sent to at 10 a.m. to try and find out what was going on there; he met Mr. the Sheriff of Missouri and Constable of , Illinois about half way, but they being disguised, they were not known by him, and when at they represented themselves as Mormon Elders , who wanted to see the Prophet. They hired a man [p. 1581]
Page 1581