History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1541
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25 April 1843 • Tuesday
<April 25> In the in the morning, and heard read the proceedings of the Twelve <Apostles> yesterday.
and other Masons came to see me concerning , when I was told that Grand Master G.M. [Jonathan] Nye was dead; which was caused the following remark When Nye was here trying to pull me by the nose, and trample on me, I enquired of the Lord if I was to be led by the nose and cuffed about by such a man’ I received for answer “wait a minute.” Nye is dead, and any man or mason who attempts to ride me down, and oppress me, will run against the boss of Jehovah’s buckler, and will be quickly moved out of the way. Nye was a hypocritical Presbyterian preacher, and was known to have committed adultery, <in this > and violated his oath as a Master Mason. He started an opposition Lodge, on the hill, called the Nye Lodge, on which subject I <said> they will do us all the injury they can, but let them go ahead, altho’ it will result in a division of the lodge.
Nye fearing the penalty of the city ordinances on adultery, speedily fled from , and soon after died suddenly in .
At 3¼ P.M. Rain fell in torrents, and wind blew strong from N. W. several barns were blown down; so dark for 15 minutes, could not see to write, considerable hail fell. The creeks rose very high, the land covered with water.
26 April 1843 • Wednesday
<26.> Wednesday. At home. Squally and cold weather.
Received of a deed of N. ½ of lot 4, block 12 on ’s 2nd addition; valued at $50 on Tithing.
27 April 1843 • Thursday
<27> At 11 A.M. Sat in Mayor’s Court, when Jonathan Ford proved a stolen horse.
Visited at bro. ’s with .
The new Nye Lodge was installed on the hill.
English State Documents show an annual loss of £3,000,000, and 1000 lives on the coast of Portsmouth, for want of harbors of refuge.
28 April 1843 • Friday
<28> At home.
29 April 1843 • Saturday
<29> Rode out to <the> Prarie with my brothers and , and John Topham, and apportioned a lot between Sister Mulholland and
Elders , , , , and rode to , Iowa.
30 April 1843 • Sunday
<30> The brethren held a Meeting at , and had a good time, about 200 Saints were present; <> is a flourishing little town, there are three saw mills, <&> two flour mills having excellent water privileges.
At 10 A.M. A trial commenced before the First Presidency, Graham Coltrin vs Anson Matthews, being an appeal from the High Council on complaint. “First— For a failure in refusing to perform according to contract respecting the sale of a piece of land by him sold to me. Second.— For transferring his property in a way to enable him to bid defiance to the result and force of law, to compel him < ◊◊> < and> to evade the aforesaid contracts thereby wronging me out of my just claim to the same, and also for lying.” &c &c.
Witnesses for plaintiff— , N.G. Blodgett, ,
Witnesses for defence— 2 Affidavits of Geo Reads, Mrs Matthews, bro [Daniel] Browett, Saml Thompson Richard Slater.
Decision of the Council is, that the charges are not sustained [p. 1541]
25 April 1843 • Tuesday
April 25 In the in the morning, and heard read the proceedings of the Twelve Apostles yesterday.
and other Masons came to see me concerning , when I was told that Grand Master G.M. [Jonathan] Nye was dead; which caused the following remark When Nye was here trying to pull me by the nose, and trample on me, I enquired of the Lord if I was to be led by the nose and cuffed about by such a man’ I received for answer “wait a minute.” Nye is dead, and any man or mason who attempts to ride me down, and oppress me, will run against the boss of Jehovah’s buckler, and will be quickly moved out of the way. Nye was a hypocritical Presbyterian preacher, and was known to have committed adultery, in this and violated his oath as a Master Mason. He started an opposition Lodge, on the hill, called the Nye Lodge, on which subject I said they will do us all the injury they can, but let them go ahead, altho’ it will result in a division of the lodge.
Nye fearing the penalty of the city ordinances on adultery, speedily fled from , and soon after died suddenly in .
At 3¼ P.M. Rain fell in torrents, and wind blew strong from N. W. several barns were blown down; so dark for 15 minutes, could not see to write, considerable hail fell. The creeks rose very high, the land covered with water.
26 April 1843 • Wednesday
26. Wednesday. At home. Squally and cold weather.
Received of a deed of N. ½ of lot 4, block 12 on ’s 2nd addition; valued at $50 on Tithing.
27 April 1843 • Thursday
27 At 11 A.M. Sat in Mayor’s Court, when Jonathan Ford proved a stolen horse.
Visited at bro. ’s with .
The Nye Lodge was installed on the hill.
English State Documents show an annual loss of £3,000,000, and 1000 lives on the coast of Portsmouth, for want of harbors of refuge.
28 April 1843 • Friday
28 At home.
29 April 1843 • Saturday
29 Rode out to the Prarie with my brothers and , and John Topham, and apportioned a lot between Sister Mulholland and
Elders , , , , and rode to , Iowa.
30 April 1843 • Sunday
30 The brethren held a Meeting at , and had a good time, about 200 Saints were present; is a flourishing little town, there are three saw mills, & two flour mills having excellent water privileges.
At 10 A.M. A trial commenced before the First Presidency, Graham Coltrin vs Anson Matthews, being an appeal from the High Council on complaint. “First— For a failure in refusing to perform according to contract respecting the sale of a piece of land by him sold to me. Second.— For transferring his property in a way to enable him to bid defiance to the result and force of law, and evade the aforesaid contracts thereby wronging me out of my just claim to the same, and also for lying.” &c &c.
Witnesses for plaintiff— , N.G. Blodgett, ,
Witnesses for defence— 2 Affidavits of Geo Reads, Mrs Matthews, bro Daniel Browett, Saml Thompson Richard Slater.
Decision of the Council is, that the charges are not sustained [p. 1541]
Page 1541