History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1398
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<September 7> and ask why the prosecution is continued against him— Here I must again appeal  to your own good judgement and you will be compelled to answer that it is——  impossible I could know him to be innocent— and as before stated it is not  my province to investigate as to his guilt or innocence, but could I know him——  innocent, and were he my own son, I would nevertheless— (and the more readily)  surrender him to the legally constituted authority to pronounce him innocent.  With sentiments of high regard and esteem— Your obedient servt. .  To Mrrs. .”
Brothers Adams and called again this afternoon and I related to them many  interpositions of divine providence in my favor. &c
8 September 1842 • Thursday
<8> Thursday 8 I dictated the following.
September 8. 1842 I have just received  your very consoling letter dated August 16. 1842 which is I think the first letter you ever  addressed to me, in which you speak of the arrival of and of his  person very respectfully. In this I rejoice; for I am as warm a friend to  as possibly as he can be to me. And in relation to his almost making a Mormon  of yourself, it puts me in mind of the saying of Paul in his reply to Agrippa  Acts xxvi. 29, “I would to God that not only thou, but also all that hear me this day; were  both almost, and altogether such as I am, except these bonds”. And I will here remark,  my dear Sir; that Mormonism is the pure doctrine of Jesus Christ; of which I myself  am not ashamed. You speak also of , President of the Church  in , in high terms: and of in . These men I am  acquainted with by information; and it warms my heart, to know that you speak  well of them; and as you say, could be willing to associate with them for ever, if  you never joined their Church, or acknowledged their faith. This is a good principle, for  when we see virtuous qualities in men, we should always acknowledge them, let their  understanding be what it may in relation to creeds and doctrine; for all men are,  or ought to be free; possessing unalienable rights, and the high and noble qualifications  of the laws of nature and of self preservation; to think, and act, and say as they  please; while they maintain a due respect to the rights and privileges of all other  creatures; infringing upon none. This doctrine I do most heartily subscribe to, and  practise; the testimony of mean men, to the contrary notwithstanding. But Sir, I will  assure you, that my soul soars far above all the mean and grovelling dispositions of men  that are disposed to abuse me and my character: I therefore shall not dwell upon that  subject. In relation to those men you speak of, referred to above; I will  only say that there are thousands of such men in this Church; who, if a man is found  worthy to associate with, will call down the envy of a mean world, because of their high  and noble demeanor; and it is with unspeakable delight that I contemplate them as  my friends and brethren. I love them with a perfect love; and I hope they love me, and  have no reason to doubt but they do. The next in consideration is  I was his friend I am yet his friend; as I feel myself bound to be a friend to all the  Sons of Adam; whether they are just or unjust, they have a degree of compassion and  sympathy, If he is my enemy it is his own fault; and the responsibility rests upon  his own head; and instead of arraigning his character before you, suffice it to say, that  his own conduct wherever he goes, will be sufficient to recommend him to an enlightened  public, whether for a bad man, or a good one. Therefore whosoever will associate themselves [p. 1398]
September 7 and ask why the prosecution is continued against him— Here I must again appeal to your own good judgement and you will be compelled to answer that it is—— impossible I could know him to be innocent— and as before stated it is not my province to investigate as to his guilt or innocence, but could I know him—— innocent, and were he my own son, I would nevertheless— (and the more readily) surrender him to the legally constituted authority to pronounce him innocent. With sentiments of high regard and esteem— Your obedient servt. . To Mrrs. .”
Brothers Adams and called again this afternoon and I related to them many interpositions of divine providence in my favor. &c
8 September 1842 • Thursday
8 Thursday 8 I dictated the following.
September 8. 1842 I have just received your very consoling letter dated August 16. 1842 which is I think the first letter you ever addressed to me, in which you speak of the arrival of and of his person very respectfully. In this I rejoice; for I am as warm a friend to as possibly as he can be to me. And in relation to his almost making a Mormon of yourself, it puts me in mind of the saying of Paul in his reply to Agrippa Acts xxvi. 29, “I would to God that not only thou, but also all that hear me this day; were both almost, and altogether such as I am, except these bonds”. And I will here remark, my dear Sir; that Mormonism is the pure doctrine of Jesus Christ; of which I myself am not ashamed. You speak also of , President of the Church in , in high terms: and of in . These men I am acquainted with by information; and it warms my heart, to know that you speak well of them; and as you say, could be willing to associate with them for ever, if you never joined their Church, or acknowledged their faith. This is a good principle, for when we see virtuous qualities in men, we should always acknowledge them, let their understanding be what it may in relation to creeds and doctrine; for all men are, or ought to be free; possessing unalienable rights, and the high and noble qualifications of the laws of nature and of self preservation; to think, and act, and say as they please; while they maintain a due respect to the rights and privileges of all other creatures; infringing upon none. This doctrine I do most heartily subscribe to, and practise; the testimony of mean men, to the contrary notwithstanding. But Sir, I will assure you, that my soul soars far above all the mean and grovelling dispositions of men that are disposed to abuse me and my character: I therefore shall not dwell upon that subject. In relation to those men you speak of, referred to above; I will only say that there are thousands of such men in this Church; who, if a man is found worthy to associate with, will call down the envy of a mean world, because of their high and noble demeanor; and it is with unspeakable delight that I contemplate them as my friends and brethren. I love them with a perfect love; and I hope they love me, and have no reason to doubt but they do. The next in consideration is I was his friend I am yet his friend; as I feel myself bound to be a friend to all the Sons of Adam; whether they are just or unjust, they have a degree of compassion and sympathy, If he is my enemy it is his own fault; and the responsibility rests upon his own head; and instead of arraigning his character before you, suffice it to say, that his own conduct wherever he goes, will be sufficient to recommend him to an enlightened public, whether for a bad man, or a good one. Therefore whosoever will associate themselves [p. 1398]
Page 1398