History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1378
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<August 17> which is laid upon me and my family, which materially affect the peace and—— welfare of this whole community; for let me assure you that there are many whole families that are entirely dependent upon the prosecution and success of Mr. Smith’s temporal business for their support. And if he is prevented from attending to the common avocations of life, who will employ those innocent, industrious poor people and provide for their wants. But my dear Sir, when I recollect the interesting interview, I and my friends had with you when at your place, and the warm assurances you gave us of your friendship and legal protection, I cannot doubt for a moment your honorable sincerity; but do still expect you to consider our claims upon your protection from every encroachment upon our legal rights as loyal citizens as we always have been, still are, and are determined always to be a law abiding people; and I still assure myself that when you are fully acquainted with illegal proceedings practiced against us in the suit of , you will recall those writs which have been issued against Mr. Smith and , as you must be aware that Mr. Smith was not in , and of course he could not have left there; with many other considerations which if duly considered will justify Mr. Smith in the course he has taken. And now I appeal to your as I would unto a Father, who is not only able but willing to shield me and mine from every unjust prosecution. I appeal to your sympathies and beg you to spare me, and my helpless children. I beg you to spare my innocent children the heartrending sorrows of again seeing their father unjustly dragged to prison or to death. I appeal to your affections as a son and beg you to spare our aged the only surviving parent we have left— the unsupportable affliction of seeing her son, who she knows to be innocent of the crimes laid to his charge, thrown again into the hands of his enemies, who have so long sought for his life; in whose life and prosperity she only looks for the few remaining comforts she can enjoy. I entreat of your to spare us these afflictions and many sufferings which cannot be uttered; and secure to yourself the pleasure of doing good, and vastly increasing human happiness; secure to yourself the benediction of the aged, and the gratitude of the young, and the blessing and veneration of the rising generation— Respectfully your most obedient—
P.S. Sir— I hope you will favor me with an answer—
Several rumors were afloat in the , intimating that my retreat had been discovered, and that it was no longer safe for me to remain at ; consequently came to see me at night and informed me of the report. It was considered wisdom that I should remove immediately, and accordingly I departed in company with and and went to s who lived on the North East part of the — Here we were kindly received and well treated—
19 August 1842 • Friday
<19> Friday morning 19. presented ’s letter of the 17th. to at in presence of . The read the letter with much attention, apparently, and when he got through he passed high encomiums on , and expressed astonishment at the judgment and talent manifest in the manner of her address. He presented the letter to requesting him to read it. then proceeded to reiterate the same [p. 1378]
August 17 which is laid upon me and my family, which materially affect the peace and—— welfare of this whole community; for let me assure you that there are many whole families that are entirely dependent upon the prosecution and success of Mr. Smith’s temporal business for their support. And if he is prevented from attending to the common avocations of life, who will employ those innocent, industrious poor people and provide for their wants. But my dear Sir, when I recollect the interesting interview, I and my friends had with you when at your place, and the warm assurances you gave us of your friendship and legal protection, I cannot doubt for a moment your honorable sincerity; but do still expect you to consider our claims upon your protection from every encroachment upon our legal rights as loyal citizens as we always have been, still are, and are determined always to be a law abiding people; and I still assure myself that when you are fully acquainted with illegal proceedings practiced against us in the suit of , you will recall those writs which have been issued against Mr. Smith and , as you must be aware that Mr. Smith was not in , and of course he could not have left there; with many other considerations which if duly considered will justify Mr. Smith in the course he has taken. And now I appeal to your as I would unto a Father, who is not only able but willing to shield me and mine from every unjust prosecution. I appeal to your sympathies and beg you to spare me, and my helpless children. I beg you to spare my innocent children the heartrending sorrows of again seeing their father unjustly dragged to prison or to death. I appeal to your affections as a son and beg you to spare our aged — the only surviving parent we have left— the unsupportable affliction of seeing her son, who she knows to be innocent of the crimes laid to his charge, thrown again into the hands of his enemies, who have so long sought for his life; in whose life and prosperity she only looks for the few remaining comforts she can enjoy. I entreat of your to spare us these afflictions and many sufferings which cannot be uttered; and secure to yourself the pleasure of doing good, and vastly increasing human happiness; secure to yourself the benediction of the aged, and the gratitude of the young, and the blessing and veneration of the rising generation— Respectfully your most obedient—
P.S. Sir— I hope you will favor me with an answer—
Several rumors were afloat in the , intimating that my retreat had been discovered, and that it was no longer safe for me to remain at ; consequently came to see me at night and informed me of the report. It was considered wisdom that I should remove immediately, and accordingly I departed in company with and and went to s who lived on the North East part of the — Here we were kindly received and well treated—
19 August 1842 • Friday
19 Friday morning 19. presented ’s letter of the 17th. to at in presence of . The read the letter with much attention, apparently, and when he got through he passed high encomiums on , and expressed astonishment at the judgment and talent manifest in the manner of her address. He presented the letter to requesting him to read it. then proceeded to reiterate the same [p. 1378]
Page 1378