History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1592
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<June 29> to give information whether they have recently had, or have been exposed to any contagious disease or diseases from whence they come, under the same penalties as are annexed to the two preceding sections of this ordinance.
Sec 4. And be it further ordained, that the aforesaid authorities are further authorized empowered, and required to enter all hotels, or houses of public entertainment, and such other habitations as they may judge proper, and require the inmates to give immediate information of [HC 5:457] all persons residing in said hotel or habitation, and their business, occupation or movements; and for a failure, non compliance, or false information, their license shall be a forfeit if it be a public house, and they, and the transient persons subject to the penalties of the three preceding sections.
Sec 5. And be it further ordained that if any of the aforesaid officers shall refuse, or neglect, to do their duty as required by this ordinance, they shall be fined one hundred dollars, and be broke of office.”
Sec 6. This ordinance to take effect and be in force, from and after its passage.
They also passed an ordinance concerning confining or keeping animals in the city of ; also an ordinance concerning bathing and swimming.
< arrived in carrying information that I expected to be in to morrow.>
30 June 1843 • Friday
<30> A messenger started from my Company in the night and arrived in early in the morning saying that I and the Company would be in the about noon. Dr. and arranged the Seats in the court room preparatory to my arrival.
At 10½ o’Clock the Brass Band and Martial Band started with and my brother to meet me, also a train of carriages containing a number of the principal inhabitants. at 8 a.m. the Company with me again started; arrived at the Big mound, about 10½ where the brethren decorated the bridles of their horses, with the flowers of the Prairie and were met by a number of the citizens, Continued our journey and at 11.25 I was gladdened when opposite my brother Hyrum’s farm about 1½ miles East of the , with seeing the Train approaching towards us, and I directed to place my life guards in their appropriate position in the procession. I was in a buggy with . and with my 3 Lawyers , and were in the stage <coach> with Lucian P. Sanger the stage proprietor. Mr. Campbell the Sheriff of and a company of about 140 were with me on horseback. [HC 5:458] I was a prisoner in the hands of the Agent of and his assistant; they were prisoners in the hands of Sheriff Campbell, who had delivered the whole of us into the hands of , guarded by my friends; so that none of us could escape. When the Company from the came up, I said I thought I would now ride a little easier, got out of the buggy, and after embracing and my brother who wept tears of joy at my return, as did also most of the great Company who surrounded us. it was a solemn silent meeting. I mounted my favorite horse “Old Charley” when the band struck up “Hail Columbia,” and proceeded to march slowly towards the [p. 1592]
June 29 to give information whether they have recently had, or have been exposed to any contagious disease or diseases from whence they come, under the same penalties as are annexed to the two preceding sections of this ordinance.
Sec 4. And be it further ordained, that the aforesaid authorities are further authorized empowered, and required to enter all hotels, or houses of public entertainment, and such other habitations as they may judge proper, and require the inmates to give immediate information of [HC 5:457] all persons residing in said hotel or habitation, and their business, occupation or movements; and for a failure, non compliance, or false information, their license shall be a forfeit if it be a public house, and they, and the transient persons subject to the penalties of the three preceding sections.
Sec 5. And be it further ordained that if any of the aforesaid officers shall refuse, or neglect, to do their duty as required by this ordinance, they shall be fined one hundred dollars, and be broke of office.”
They also passed an ordinance concerning confining or keeping animals in the city of ; also an ordinance concerning bathing and swimming.
30 June 1843 • Friday
30 A messenger started from my Company in the night and arrived in early in the morning saying that I and the Company would be in the about noon. Dr. and arranged the Seats in the court room preparatory to my arrival.
At 10½ o’Clock the Brass Band and Martial Band started with and my brother to meet me, also a train of carriages containing a number of the principal inhabitants. at 8 a.m. the Company with me again started; arrived at the Big mound, about 10½ where the brethren decorated the bridles of their horses, with the flowers of the Prairie and were met by a number of the citizens, Continued our journey and at 11.25 I was gladdened when opposite my brother Hyrum’s farm about 1½ miles East of the , with seeing the Train approaching towards us, and I directed to place my life guards in their appropriate position in the procession. I was in a buggy with . and with my 3 Lawyers , and were in the stage coach with Lucian P. Sanger the stage proprietor. Mr. Campbell the Sheriff of and a company of about 140 were with me on horseback. [HC 5:458] I was a prisoner in the hands of the Agent of and his assistant; they were prisoners in the hands of Sheriff Campbell, who had delivered the whole of us into the hands of , guarded by my friends; so that none of us could escape. When the Company from the came up, I said I thought I would now ride a little easier, got out of the buggy, and after embracing and my brother who wept tears of joy at my return, as did also most of the great Company who surrounded us. it was a solemn silent meeting. I mounted my favorite horse “Old Charley” when the band struck up “Hail Columbia,” and proceeded to march slowly towards the [p. 1592]
Page 1592