History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1577
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<June 12> to organize the second Battalion, first Regiment, second Cohort, into a Regiment of Light Infantry, to be called “The Escort Regiment of light Infantry” to take place in the second Cohort according to assignment, on parade days, and do such other duties of escort &c. as may be necessary, and that he organize the first Battalion, first Regiment second Cohort, into a Regiment of artillery.”
About 40 Saints arrived from Peterboro New Hampshire.
13 June 1843 • Tuesday
<13> I started North with and the children to see her Sister Mrs. [Clara] Wasson and family living near , Lee County.
when going to the Prairie with several brethren to fence his five acre lot, broke the reach of his wagon, and all fell in a pile together; the wheel fell on his arm and bruised him considerably, but he was able to mend his wagon and continue his journey; after working hard all day, he went to brother [Elijah] Cheney’s house to obtain a drink of water, when an ugly dog bit him thro’ the calf of his leg, which made him very lame.
14 June 1843 • Wednesday
<14> Business is progressing; buildings are going up in every direction; and the citizens manifest a determination that shall be built up. the Stones of the begin to rise tier upon tier and <it> it already presents a stately and noble appearance.
The has been rising 3 or 4 days, and is now 3 or 4 inches above high water mark.
15 June 1843 • Thursday
<15> We give the following extract from the “Salem Advertizer and Argus” being an extract from a lecture delivered in Salem by Mr J. B. Newhall. [HC 5:431]
“The Nauvoo is a very singular and unique structure. It is 150 feet in length, 98 feet wide, and when finished will be 150 feet high. It is different from any thing in ancient or modern history. Every thing about it is on a magnificent scale and when finished and seen from the opposite side of the , will present one, if not the most beautiful, chaste, and noble specimens of Architecture to be found in the World. We should like to be in possession of a model of this building, both on account of its great notoriety, as being connected with the Mormon or Latter day Saints’ religion, and also a work of art. Did our limits here permit, we might give a very minute description of the whole order of architecture This splendid drawing was executed by Mr. Newhall, while in , from a copy in the archives of that . We wish he had taken it on a large scale, but he probably did not on account of transportation. We regret exceedingly that we did not have the privilege of a near inspection of the Map of the city of ; the place which for sometime past has created more intense interest perhaps than any other city town or village in the country, if not in the World. But on inquiring for it, we found it had been rolled up and packed away. He gave a very glowing and interesting account of this . The location is one of the most beautiful upon the earth. Situated on the , rising in an inclined plane till it reaches the height where it overlooks an extensive tract of territory, unrivalled in rich and varying scenery. [p. 1577]
June 12 to organize the second Battalion, first Regiment, second Cohort, into a Regiment of Light Infantry, to be called “The Escort Regiment of light Infantry” to take place in the second Cohort according to assignment, on parade days, and do such other duties of escort &c. as may be necessary, and that he organize the first Battalion, first Regiment second Cohort, into a Regiment of artillery.”
About 40 Saints arrived from Peterboro New Hampshire.
13 June 1843 • Tuesday
13 I started North with and the children to see her Sister Mrs. [Clara] Wasson and family living near , Lee County.
when going to the Prairie with several brethren to fence his five acre lot, broke the reach of his wagon, and all fell in a pile together; the wheel fell on his arm and bruised him considerably, but he was able to mend his wagon and continue his journey; after working hard all day, he went to brother [Elijah] Cheney’s house to obtain a drink of water, when an ugly dog bit him thro’ the calf of his leg, which made him very lame.
14 June 1843 • Wednesday
14 Business is progressing; buildings are going up in every direction; and the citizens manifest a determination that shall be built up. the Stones of the begin to rise tier upon tier and it already presents a stately and noble appearance.
The has been rising 3 or 4 days, and is now 3 or 4 inches above high water mark.
15 June 1843 • Thursday
15 We give the following extract from the “Salem Advertizer and Argus” being an extract from a lecture delivered in Salem by Mr J. B. Newhall. [HC 5:431]
“The Nauvoo is a very singular and unique structure. It is 150 feet in length, 98 feet wide, and when finished will be 150 feet high. It is different from any thing in ancient or modern history. Every thing about it is on a magnificent scale and when finished and seen from the opposite side of the , will present one, if not the most beautiful, chaste, and noble specimens of Architecture to be found in the World. We should like to be in possession of a model of this building, both on account of its great notoriety, as being connected with the Mormon or Latter day Saints’ religion, and also a work of art. Did our limits here permit, we might give a very minute description of the whole order of architecture This splendid drawing was executed by Mr. Newhall, while in , from a copy in the archives of that . We wish he had taken it on a large scale, but he probably did not on account of transportation. We regret exceedingly that we did not have the privilege of a near inspection of the Map of the city of ; the place which for sometime past has created more intense interest perhaps than any other city town or village in the country, if not in the World. But on inquiring for it, we found it had been rolled up and packed away. He gave a very glowing and interesting account of this . The location is one of the most beautiful upon the earth. Situated on the , rising in an inclined plane till it reaches the height where it overlooks an extensive tract of territory, unrivalled in rich and varying scenery. [p. 1577]
Page 1577