History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<August 16> you will retain in your hands for the present. my respects to your amiable  and all friends, and believe me as ever, tho, not a mormon, your sincere friend—  — P.S. I know of no reason why the Wasp was not  continued to be sent to me. I don’t like the name. Mildness should characterize  every thing that comes from , and even a name as Peleg says in his Ethics  has much influence on one side or the other— My respects to your , its Editor[.]  I would just say that General appeared to me to be in very  low Spirits and I find that many communications intended for you from me,  have never reached you. Those books were made over to on the  presumption that he would in his own name present them for the benefit of the  [”]
17 August 1842 • Wednesday
<17> Wednesday 17. I walked out into the woods for exercise in company with , where we were accidentally discovered by a young man, we asked him  various questions, concerning the public feeling, and situation of matters around,  to all which he answered promptly, on being requested not to make it known  where we were, he promised faithfully he would not, and said time would  tell whether he did or no.
, Illinois, August 17. 1842— Lieutenant General Joseph Smith— Dear  friend— Every thing is moving along in the in the usual tranquil and industrious  manner, there is no change in the appearance of things that a common observer could  see, altho’ to one who knows, and is acquaint<ed> with the countenances of the thinking  few, it is evident that their minds are troubled more than common, and I know  by myself that they cannot help it, and why should it be otherwise when the  Lord’s anointed is hunted like a Lion of the Forest by the most wicked and  oppressive generation that has ever been since the days of our Savior, indeed every  movement of this generation reminds me of the history of the people who——  crucified Christ, it was nothing but mob law, mob rule, and mob violence all the  time, the only difference is that the Governors then, were more just than the Governors  now, they were willing to acquit innocent men, but our Governors now, despise  justice, garble and <pervert> the law, and join in with the mob in pursuit of  innocent blood. I have been meditating on your communication of yesterday and  will just add a thought or so on the subject, respecting particularly your going to the  . I think I would not go there for some time if at all. I do not  believe that an armed force will come upon us at all, unless they get hold of you  first, and then we rescue you which we would do under any circumstances with  the help of God, but I would rather do it within the limits of the , under the  laws of the ; therefore I would think it better to quarter in the and not  long in one place at once— I see no reason why you might not stay in safety within  the for months without any knowing it only those who ought, and that as few  as is necessary. I must close for the present remaining as ever your affectionate  friend and obedient servant— —”
August 17. 1842— To his Excellency — Sir— It is with feelings  of no ordinary cast that I have retired after the business of the day and evening too,  to address your honor. I am at a loss how to commence; my mind is crowded with  subjects too numerous to be contained in one letter. I find myself almost destitute of  that confidence, necessary to address a person holding the authority of your dignified [p. 1376]
August 16 you will retain in your hands for the present. my respects to your amiable and all friends, and believe me as ever, tho, not a mormon, your sincere friend— — P.S. I know of no reason why the Wasp was not continued to be sent to me. I don’t like the name. Mildness should characterize every thing that comes from , and even a name as Peleg says in his Ethics has much influence on one side or the other— My respects to your , its Editor. I would just say that General appeared to me to be in very low Spirits and I find that many communications intended for you from me, have never reached you. Those books were made over to on the presumption that he would in his own name present them for the benefit of the
17 August 1842 • Wednesday
17 Wednesday 17. I walked out into the woods for exercise in company with , where we were accidentally discovered by a young man, we asked him various questions, concerning the public feeling, and situation of matters around, to all which he answered promptly, on being requested not to make it known where we were, he promised faithfully he would not, and said time would tell whether he did or no.
, Illinois, August 17. 1842— Lieutenant General Joseph Smith— Dear friend— Every thing is moving along in the in the usual tranquil and industrious manner, there is no change in the appearance of things that a common observer could see, altho’ to one who knows, and is acquainted with the countenances of the thinking few, it is evident that their minds are troubled more than common, and I know by myself that they cannot help it, and why should it be otherwise when the Lord’s anointed is hunted like a Lion of the Forest by the most wicked and oppressive generation that has ever been since the days of our Savior, indeed every movement of this generation reminds me of the history of the people who—— crucified Christ, it was nothing but mob law, mob rule, and mob violence all the time, the only difference is that the Governors then, were more just than the Governors now, they were willing to acquit innocent men, but our Governors now, despise justice, garble and pervert the law, and join in with the mob in pursuit of innocent blood. I have been meditating on your communication of yesterday and will just add a thought or so on the subject, respecting particularly your going to the . I think I would not go there for some time if at all. I do not believe that an armed force will come upon us at all, unless they get hold of you first, and then we rescue you which we would do under any circumstances with the help of God, but I would rather do it within the limits of the , under the laws of the ; therefore I would think it better to quarter in the and not long in one place at once— I see no reason why you might not stay in safety within the for months without any knowing it only those who ought, and that as few as is necessary. I must close for the present remaining as ever your affectionate friend and obedient servant— —”
August 17. 1842— To his Excellency — Sir— It is with feelings of no ordinary cast that I have retired after the business of the day and evening too, to address your honor. I am at a loss how to commence; my mind is crowded with subjects too numerous to be contained in one letter. I find myself almost destitute of that confidence, necessary to address a person holding the authority of your dignified [p. 1376]
Page 1376