History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1452
image
<January 6> The opinion of as recorded in this history was copied from the “Sangamo Journal”, and believed to be ’s opinion as corrected and altered by him from the report furnished him by my . In the Judge’s opinion on the bench he remarked like this “were it my prerogative to impeach Congress, for any one thing, it would be for granting power for the transportation of fugitives on Affidavit, and not on indictment alone”. He also passed several severe strictures on the actions of different Governors and Officers concerned in my case, but which I suppose he thought proper to omit in his printed copy. I received many invitations to visit distinguished Gentlemen in , which time would not permit me to comply with. Also a ticket from the Manager to attend the Theatre this evening. but the play was prevented by the rain.
7 January 1843 • Saturday
<7> Saturday 7. At 8½ <in the morning> We left ’ to return to , and arrived at Captain [Ebenezer] Dutch’s at 4 <in the evening> Travelling very bad, with Snow and Mud, and yet so cold as to whiten the horses with frost. While riding this day and composed a Jubilee song, which they wrote and sung in the evening, and “Dedicated to all <lovers> of Liberties,” as printed on the first page of the 37th. Number of “The Wasp”
Recent accounts from Alexandria in Egypt, state the Mortality -[Murrain]- among Cattle still continued, and it was calculated that upwards of 200,000 Oxen had already died.
8 January 1843 • Sunday
<8> Sunday 8. at 8 in <morning> we left Captain [Ebenezer] Dutch’s, and passing through and , and crossing the on the Ice, arrived at at 4 P.M. After supper I went to Mr. ’s, with several of the brethren, and spent the evening very agreeably, partly in examining drafts of improvements he had made in some operative, and defensive Machinery.
9 January 1843 • Monday
<9> Monday 9. at 8½ <in morning> Started for ; roads very hard, smooth and icy. When about 2 miles west of at 12½ P.M. the Horses of the Large Carriage slipped and became unmanageable, and horses and carriage with and in it went off the embankment, some 6 or 8 feet perpendicular, doing no damage, except breaking the fore axletree and top of the Carriage. It was a remarkable interposition of Providence that neither of the brethren were injured in the least. The company agreed that should pay the damage, cut down a small tree, spliced the axle, drove on, and arrived at ’s in about 4 P.M. After supper I visited my Sister Catherine Salisbury, accompanied by and Sister Durphy. This was the first time I had visited her in the State of , and the circumstance brought vividly to my mind many things pertaining to my ’s house of which I spake freely and particularly of my brother . He was a very handsome man, surpassed by none but Adam and Seth, and of great strength. When two Irishmen were fighting, and one was about to gouge the other’s eyes, took him by his collar and breeches, and threw him over the ring, which was composed of men standing around to witness the fight (“While there” said “my heart was pained to see a Sister of Joseph’s almost barefoot, and four lovely children entirely so, in the middle of a severe winter. What has not Joseph and his ’s family suffered to bring forth the work of the Lord in these last days”) We returned to ’s just before the close of the meeting at the School House where preached. After passing the usual salutations with several who had called [p. 1452]
January 6 The opinion of as recorded in this history was copied from the “Sangamo Journal”, and believed to be ’s opinion as corrected and altered by him from the report furnished him by my . In the Judge’s opinion on the bench he remarked like this “were it my prerogative to impeach Congress, for any one thing, it would be for granting power for the transportation of fugitives on Affidavit, and not on indictment alone”. He also passed several severe strictures on the actions of different Governors and Officers concerned in my case, but which I suppose he thought proper to omit in his printed copy. I received many invitations to visit distinguished Gentlemen in , which time would not permit me to comply with. Also a ticket from the Manager to attend the Theatre this evening. but the play was prevented by the rain.
7 January 1843 • Saturday
7 Saturday 7. At 8½ in the morning We left ’ to return to , and arrived at Captain [Ebenezer] Dutch’s at 4 in the evening Travelling very bad, with Snow and Mud, and yet so cold as to whiten the horses with frost. While riding this day and composed a Jubilee song, which they wrote and sung in the evening, and “Dedicated to all lovers of Liberties,” as printed on the first page of the 37th. Number of “The Wasp”
Recent accounts from Alexandria in Egypt, state the Mortality -[Murrain]- among Cattle still continued, and it was calculated that upwards of 200,000 Oxen had already died.
8 January 1843 • Sunday
8 Sunday 8. at 8 in morning we left Captain [Ebenezer] Dutch’s, and passing through and , and crossing the on the Ice, arrived at at 4 P.M. After supper I went to Mr. ’s, with several of the brethren, and spent the evening very agreeably, partly in examining drafts of improvements he had made in some operative, and defensive Machinery.
9 January 1843 • Monday
9 Monday 9. at 8½ in morning Started for ; roads very hard, smooth and icy. When about 2 miles west of at 12½ P.M. the Horses of the Large Carriage slipped and became unmanageable, and horses and carriage with and in it went off the embankment, some 6 or 8 feet perpendicular, doing no damage, except breaking the fore axletree and top of the Carriage. It was a remarkable interposition of Providence that neither of the brethren were injured in the least. The company agreed that should pay the damage, cut down a small tree, spliced the axle, drove on, and arrived at ’s in about 4 P.M. After supper I visited my Sister Catherine Salisbury, accompanied by and Sister Durphy. This was the first time I had visited her in the State of , and the circumstance brought vividly to my mind many things pertaining to my ’s house of which I spake freely and particularly of my brother . He was a very handsome man, surpassed by none but Adam and Seth, and of great strength. When two Irishmen were fighting, and one was about to gouge the other’s eyes, took him by his collar and breeches, and threw him over the ring, which was composed of men standing around to witness the fight (“While there” said “my heart was pained to see a Sister of Joseph’s almost barefoot, and four lovely children entirely so, in the middle of a severe winter. What has not Joseph and his ’s family suffered to bring forth the work of the Lord in these last days”) We returned to ’s just before the close of the meeting at the School House where preached. After passing the usual salutations with several who had called [p. 1452]
Page 1452