History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1406
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<October 11> for examination, and to give account of their work at the . After carefully  and attentively examining and comparing their books and accounts, the Trustee expressed  himself well satisfied with the proceedings and labors of the Committee, and ordered that  this be published in the Times and Seasons, that the Saints may know the fact and be  thereby encouraged to double their exertions and forward means-[?]- to roll on the building  of the in . It was also ordered that the Recorder’s office  be henceforth removed to the Committee House near the ; all property and  means must therefore be brought to that place, where it will be recorded in due form.  , October 11, 1842. , Clerk, and Recorder for the [”]
13 October 1842 • Thursday
<13> The brethren arrived from with a raft of about 90000 feet of boards and  24000 cubic feet of Timber for the and
15 October 1842 • Saturday
<15> Saturday 15 Brother returned to and informed my  friends that I was well.
16 October 1842 • Sunday
<16> Sunday 16. I copy the following from the Herald
“The Mormons.  . October 16. 1842. Gen — Sir— Some time since, I  addressed a letter to Joseph Smith, the Mormon Prophet, in answer to a letter of his,  introducing to my “kind attention” a friend of his from the Holy City of .  In this letter I expressed my regret that the quarrel between him and  should have at all found its way to the public eye, this being the sole cause of placing  him in his present awkward situation. I likewise commiserated with him in his  affliction, and signed myself, at the conclusion of my letter, as his friend, which  I really am, and the friend of all good Mormons, as well as other good men.  Why should I not be Joseph Smith’s friend? He has done nothing to injure me,  nor do I believe he has done any thing to injure of .  The , no doubt, under strong feelings, may have thought and believed that  Smith, had preconcerted the plan for his assassination; but there is no legal——  evidence whatever of that fact. None by which an unprejudiced jury would convict  any man, yet to send this man into , under the present requisition, would  be an act of great injustice, as his ruin would be certain. How could any man,  against whom there is a bitter religious prejudice, escape ruin, being in the  circumstances of Smith? Look at the history of past ages— see the force of fanaticism  and bigotry in bringing to the stake some of the best of men; and in all these cases  the persecutors had their pretexts, as well as in the case of the Mormon chief.  Nothing follows its victims with such deadly aim as religious zeal, and therefore  nothing should be so much guarded against by the civil power.  Smith I conceive, has just as good a right to establish a church, if he can do it,  as Luther, Calvin, Wesley, Fox or even King Henry the Eighth. All these Chiefs in  religion had their opponents, and their people their persecutors. Henry the Eighth was  excommunicated, body and bones, soul and all, by his Holiness the Pope; still the  Church of England has lived, as well as all the other sects. Just so, it will be with the  Mormons. They may kill one Prophet, and confine in chains half his followers,  but another will take his place, and the Mormons will still go ahead.  One of their Elders said to me, when conversing on this subject, that they were like a  Mustard plant— “If you don’t disturb it, the seed will fall and multiply; and if you  kick it about, you only give the seed more soil, and it will multiply the more.” Undertake [p. 1406]
October 11 for examination, and to give account of their work at the . After carefully and attentively examining and comparing their books and accounts, the Trustee expressed himself well satisfied with the proceedings and labors of the Committee, and ordered that this be published in the Times and Seasons, that the Saints may know the fact and be thereby encouraged to double their exertions and forward means-[?]- to roll on the building of the in . It was also ordered that the Recorder’s office be henceforth removed to the Committee House near the ; all property and means must therefore be brought to that place, where it will be recorded in due form. , October 11, 1842. , Clerk, and Recorder for the
13 October 1842 • Thursday
13 The brethren arrived from with a raft of about 90000 feet of boards and 24000 cubic feet of Timber for the and
15 October 1842 • Saturday
15 Saturday 15 Brother returned to and informed my friends that I was well.
16 October 1842 • Sunday
16 Sunday 16. I copy the following from the Herald
“The Mormons. . October 16. 1842. Gen — Sir— Some time since, I addressed a letter to Joseph Smith, the Mormon Prophet, in answer to a letter of his, introducing to my “kind attention” a friend of his from the Holy City of . In this letter I expressed my regret that the quarrel between him and should have at all found its way to the public eye, this being the sole cause of placing him in his present awkward situation. I likewise commiserated with him in his affliction, and signed myself, at the conclusion of my letter, as his friend, which I really am, and the friend of all good Mormons, as well as other good men. Why should I not be Joseph Smith’s friend? He has done nothing to injure me, nor do I believe he has done any thing to injure of . The , no doubt, under strong feelings, may have thought and believed that Smith, had preconcerted the plan for his assassination; but there is no legal—— evidence whatever of that fact. None by which an unprejudiced jury would convict any man, yet to send this man into , under the present requisition, would be an act of great injustice, as his ruin would be certain. How could any man, against whom there is a bitter religious prejudice, escape ruin, being in the circumstances of Smith? Look at the history of past ages— see the force of fanaticism and bigotry in bringing to the stake some of the best of men; and in all these cases the persecutors had their pretexts, as well as in the case of the Mormon chief. Nothing follows its victims with such deadly aim as religious zeal, and therefore nothing should be so much guarded against by the civil power. Smith I conceive, has just as good a right to establish a church, if he can do it, as Luther, Calvin, Wesley, Fox or even King Henry the Eighth. All these Chiefs in religion had their opponents, and their people their persecutors. Henry the Eighth was excommunicated, body and bones, soul and all, by his Holiness the Pope; still the Church of England has lived, as well as all the other sects. Just so, it will be with the Mormons. They may kill one Prophet, and confine in chains half his followers, but another will take his place, and the Mormons will still go ahead. One of their Elders said to me, when conversing on this subject, that they were like a Mustard plant— “If you don’t disturb it, the seed will fall and multiply; and if you kick it about, you only give the seed more soil, and it will multiply the more.” Undertake [p. 1406]
Page 1406