History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<January 11> to the consideration of the brethren, the situation of our President, who has long had all his business deranged, and has been recently obliged to expand large sums of money in—— procuring his release from unjust persecution, leaving him destitute of necessaries for his family, and of means for prosecuting the History of the Church and the translations which he is anxious should be in the hands of the brethren as speedily as possible. We therefore recommend that collections be taken at the different meetings, for his benefit, and such as have not cash will recollect that provisions will be an excellent substitute whenever it is convenient to bring them in; and we hope our brethren who are farmers in , , &c and the region around, will have the opportunity of reading these few hints. A word to the wise is sufficient. The lord loveth a cheerful and bountiful giver, and will restore an hundred fold— for the laborer is worthy of his hire.
President. — Clerk— January 11. 1843.[”] [HC 5:249]
12 January 1843 • Thursday
<12> Thursday 12. At home all day
13 January 1843 • Friday
<13> Friday 13. At home till near Sun set, then went to brother with to see Sophia Marks, who was sick: heard her relate her vision or dream of a visit from her two brothers who were dead, touching the associations and relations of another world.
14 January 1843 • Saturday
<14> Saturday 14 Rode out with in the morning— At 10 a.m. attended City Council, and in the evening called the Quorum together in my to pray for Sophia Marks who was very sick.
15 January 1843 • Sunday
<15> Sunday 15. I spent at home with my family.
16 January 1843 • Monday
<16> Monday 16. I was about home, and directed a letter to be written as follows
January 16. 1843— Esqre.— Dr. Sir— I now sit down to inform you of our safe arrival home on Tuesday last, after a cold and troublesome journey of four days. We found our families well and cheerful. The news of our arrival was soon generally known, and when it was understood that justice had once more triumphed over oppression, and the innocent been rescued from the power of Mobocracy, gladness filled the hearts of the Citizens of , and gratitude to those who had so nobly and manfully defended the cause of justice and innocence was universally manifest, and of course I rejoiced with them and felt like a free man at home. Yesterday a letter was received by Esqre. from which was handed to me this morning[.] From that letter it appears that was at a few days after we left there, and that he is determined if possible to keep up the persecution against me[.] I herewith transmit a copy of his letter and shall rely upon your Council, in the event of any further attempt to oppress me, and deprive me of liberty; but I am in hopes that will not gratify the spirit of oppression and mobocracy so glaringly manifest in the conduct of .” The following is a copy of his letter
Ill. Jany. 10. 1843 Mr. and . Dear Friends— It is a long time since I have written <to> you, and I [HC 5:250] should now much desire to see you, but I leave to night for to meet the messenger charged with the arrest of Joseph Smith, , and others for murder, burglary, treason &c &c who will be demanded in a few days on new indictments, found by the grand jury of a called court on the original evidence, and in relation to which a nolle prosequi was entered by the district Attorney. New proceedings have been gotten up on the old charges— and no Habeas Corpus [p. 1454]
January 11 to the consideration of the brethren, the situation of our President, who has long had all his business deranged, and has been recently obliged to expand large sums of money in—— procuring his release from unjust persecution, leaving him destitute of necessaries for his family, and of means for prosecuting the History of the Church and the translations which he is anxious should be in the hands of the brethren as speedily as possible. We therefore recommend that collections be taken at the different meetings, for his benefit, and such as have not cash will recollect that provisions will be an excellent substitute whenever it is convenient to bring them in; and we hope our brethren who are farmers in , , &c and the region around, will have the opportunity of reading these few hints. A word to the wise is sufficient. The lord loveth a cheerful and bountiful giver, and will restore an hundred fold— for the laborer is worthy of his hire.
President. — Clerk— January 11. 1843.” [HC 5:249]
12 January 1843 • Thursday
12 Thursday 12. At home all day
13 January 1843 • Friday
13 Friday 13. At home till near Sun set, then went to brother with to see Sophia Marks, who was sick: heard her relate her vision or dream of a visit from her two brothers who were dead, touching the associations and relations of another world.
14 January 1843 • Saturday
14 Saturday 14 Rode out with in the morning— At 10 a.m. attended City Council, and in the evening called the Quorum together in my to pray for Sophia Marks who was very sick.
15 January 1843 • Sunday
15 Sunday 15. I spent at home with my family.
16 January 1843 • Monday
16 Monday 16. I was about home, and directed a letter to be written as follows
January 16. 1843— Esqre.— Dr. Sir— I now sit down to inform you of our safe arrival home on Tuesday last, after a cold and troublesome journey of four days. We found our families well and cheerful. The news of our arrival was soon generally known, and when it was understood that justice had once more triumphed over oppression, and the innocent been rescued from the power of Mobocracy, gladness filled the hearts of the Citizens of , and gratitude to those who had so nobly and manfully defended the cause of justice and innocence was universally manifest, and of course I rejoiced with them and felt like a free man at home. Yesterday a letter was received by Esqre. from which was handed to me this morning. From that letter it appears that was at a few days after we left there, and that he is determined if possible to keep up the persecution against me. I herewith transmit a copy of his letter and shall rely upon your Council, in the event of any further attempt to oppress me, and deprive me of liberty; but I am in hopes that will not gratify the spirit of oppression and mobocracy so glaringly manifest in the conduct of .” The following is a copy of his letter
Ill. Jany. 10. 1843 Mr. and . Dear Friends— It is a long time since I have written to you, and I [HC 5:250] should now much desire to see you, but I leave to night for to meet the messenger charged with the arrest of Joseph Smith, , and others for murder, burglary, treason &c &c who will be demanded in a few days on new indictments, found by the grand jury of a called court on the original evidence, and in relation to which a nolle prosequi was entered by the district Attorney. New proceedings have been gotten up on the old charges— and no Habeas Corpus [p. 1454]
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