History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1546
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<May 3> citizens; this is a thing that we always have protested against, and we always shall, so long  as that blood that fired the bosoms of our ancestors who fought, bled and died, in defence of  equal rights, flows through our veins.
Concerning religion we consider that all men have a right to worship Almighty  God according to the dictates of their own conscience; and while we allow all men freely to  enjoy this privilege untrammeled by us, we look upon all men that would abridge us, or others,  in their religious rights, as enemies to the constitution; recreant to the principles of republicanism;  and whilst they render themselves despicable, they are striking a secret, but deadly blow at the  freedom of this great republic, and their withering influence, though unseen and unobserved, by  the many, is like a worm gnawing the very vitals of the tree of liberty. We shall always contend  for our religious rights. In short the liberty of the press, liberty of conscience and of worship, free  discussion, sailors rights, we shall always sustain”
4 May 1843 • Thursday
<4> At 4 P.M. heard read a letter from , shewing that he was  sick and could not attend the inspection of the Nauvoo Legion, according to his appointment.
Having received a letter from in relation to his land difficulties,  I went to and procured a deed for ’s farm, and settled  that business
5 May 1843 • Friday
<5> Told the Temple Committee that I had a right to take away any property I  choose from the Temple Office or Store, and they had no right to stand in the way. It is  the people that are to dictate me, and not the Committee. All the property I have  belongs to the , and what I do is for the benefit of the , and you have no  authority, only as you receive it from me.
Received the following:
. 7th April 1843
Joseph Smith Esq. Dear Sir.— I received on Saturday last a letter from  Mr Catlin notifying me that the equity of redemption in my property would be sold  on the 12th instant and asking me whether I wished it to be purchased for me— I suppose  it is quite immaterial whether I or you hold the right of redeeming, for if it should again  come into my possession I wish it understood distinctly by them who have built upon it  that I shall not attempt to take their buildings from them, but shall be ready at anytime  to give them a lease of their lots for a very long period, and at a reasonable rent— My  wish as well as my interest leads me to conciliate, and make them my friends, instead  of making them my enemies. Your Obdt Servt.
.”
which I recorded in the City Record of Deeds.
“Recorder’s Office May 5th, 1843
State of ) SS.
City of )
I Joseph Smith Recorder in and for the said city of  , Hancock County, and State aforesaid, do hereby certify that the within letter was  duly recorded in Book A. Page 140, and numbered 134
Joseph Smith Recorder
by, , Clerk.” [p. 1546]
May 3 citizens; this is a thing that we always have protested against, and we always shall, so long as that blood that fired the bosoms of our ancestors who fought, bled and died, in defence of equal rights, flows through our veins.
Concerning religion we consider that all men have a right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own conscience; and while we allow all men freely to enjoy this privilege untrammeled by us, we look upon all men that would abridge us, or others, in their religious rights, as enemies to the constitution; recreant to the principles of republicanism; and whilst they render themselves despicable, they are striking a secret, but deadly blow at the freedom of this great republic, and their withering influence, though unseen and unobserved, by the many, is like a worm gnawing the very vitals of the tree of liberty. We shall always contend for our religious rights. In short the liberty of the press, liberty of conscience and of worship, free discussion, sailors rights, we shall always sustain”
4 May 1843 • Thursday
4 At 4 P.M. heard read a letter from , shewing that he was sick and could not attend the inspection of the Nauvoo Legion, according to his appointment.
Having received a letter from in relation to his land difficulties, I went to and procured a deed for ’s farm, and settled that business
5 May 1843 • Friday
5 Told the Temple Committee that I had a right to take away any property I choose from the Temple Office or Store, and they had no right to stand in the way. It is the people that are to dictate me, and not the Committee. All the property I have belongs to the , and what I do is for the benefit of the , and you have no authority, only as you receive it from me.
Received the following:
. 7th April 1843
Joseph Smith Esq. Dear Sir.— I received on Saturday last a letter from Mr Catlin notifying me that the equity of redemption in my property would be sold on the 12th instant and asking me whether I wished it to be purchased for me— I suppose it is quite immaterial whether I or you hold the right of redeeming, for if it should again come into my possession I wish it understood distinctly by them who have built upon it that I shall not attempt to take their buildings from them, but shall be ready at anytime to give them a lease of their lots for a very long period, and at a reasonable rent— My wish as well as my interest leads me to conciliate, and make them my friends, instead of making them my enemies. Your Obdt Servt.
.”
which I recorded in the City Record of Deeds.
“Recorder’s Office May 5th, 1843
State of ) SS.
City of )
I Joseph Smith Recorder in and for the said city of , Hancock County, and State aforesaid, do hereby certify that the within letter was duly recorded in Book A. Page 140, and numbered 134
Joseph Smith Recorder
by, , Clerk.” [p. 1546]
Page 1546