History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1365
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<August 11> hailed a person in the bank, but received a very unsatisfactory answer, whereupon we turned about and put to the channel, and upon coming near the middle of the [HC 5:90] discovered two fires a little higher. We immediately steered towards the fires and were happy to find awaiting our arrival. We then proceeded through the timber to ’s house where we were very kindly received and made welcome. and departed each for home expressing their perfect willingness to aid us in every possible manner. also promised to ascertain the state of affairs in and give us the earliest information.
12 August 1842 • Friday
<12> Friday 12. This forenoon it appeared still more evident that the whole course of proceedings by and others were illegal. After some consultation with brother , concluded to despatch a messenger with a Letter to of to request him to go to , Iowa Territory and there see the of , and endeavor to ascertain whether had made any requisition on him for myself and . William Walker proceeded to cross the on my horse, Jo. Duncan, in sight of a number of persons— one chief design in this movement was, to draw the attention of the Sherriffs and Public from all idea that I was on the side of the .
At night and left after dark and came to see me, and found me cheerful and in good spirits.
13 August 1842 • Saturday
<13> Saturday 13 This forenoon received a letter from at , stating that had said, that his proceedings were illegal, and he should not pursue the subject any further. The letter also stated that Ford (the agent to receive me from the hands of the Sheriff and carry me to ) had concluded to take the first boat and start home: and that he was going to fetch a force from . All this my friends thought was only a scheme got up for the pur[HC 5:91]pose of throwing us off our guard that they might come unexpectedly . . . . . . . kidnap, and carry me to . I had [blank] sent a request to to come and see me, and she had concluded to start in the Carriage, but while it was preparing, it attracted the attention of the Sheriff who kept a close watch of all movements. To avoid suspicion, walked to Sister Durphy’s and waited the arrival of the carriage. which passed off down the with and , with raised curtains, receiving by the way, without any discovery, by the Sheriff. when about four miles down the the carriage turned on the the Prairie and passing round the turned into the Timber opposite Wiggan’s farm. when alighted and walked to ’s and the carriage returned. I was in good Spirits although somewhat afflicted in body, and was much rejoiced to meet my dear once more.
A report came over the that “there are several small companies of Men in , , &c in search of Joseph, they saw his horse go down the yesterday and were confident he was on that side. They swear they will have him. It is said there is a reward of thirteen hundred dollars offered for the apprehnesion and delivery of Joseph and , and this is supposed to have induced them to make search. [blank] The Sheriff and Deputy have uttered heavy [p. 1365]
August 11 hailed a person in the bank, but received a very unsatisfactory answer, whereupon we turned about and put to the channel, and upon coming near the middle of the [HC 5:90] discovered two fires a little higher. We immediately steered towards the fires and were happy to find awaiting our arrival. We then proceeded through the timber to ’s house where we were very kindly received and made welcome. and departed each for home expressing their perfect willingness to aid us in every possible manner. also promised to ascertain the state of affairs in and give us the earliest information.
12 August 1842 • Friday
12 Friday 12. This forenoon it appeared still more evident that the whole course of proceedings by and others were illegal. After some consultation with brother , concluded to despatch a messenger with a Letter to of to request him to go to , Iowa Territory and there see the of , and endeavor to ascertain whether had made any requisition on him for myself and . William Walker proceeded to cross the on my horse, Jo. Duncan, in sight of a number of persons— one chief design in this movement was, to draw the attention of the Sherriffs and Public from all idea that I was on the side of the .
At night and left after dark and came to see me, and found me cheerful and in good spirits.
13 August 1842 • Saturday
13 Saturday 13 This forenoon received a letter from at , stating that had said, that his proceedings were illegal, and he should not pursue the subject any further. The letter also stated that Ford (the agent to receive me from the hands of the Sheriff and carry me to ) had concluded to take the first boat and start home: and that he was going to fetch a force from . All this my friends thought was only a scheme got up for the pur[HC 5:91]pose of throwing us off our guard that they might come unexpectedly . . . . . . . kidnap, and carry me to . I had [blank] sent a request to to come and see me, and she had concluded to start in the Carriage, but while it was preparing, it attracted the attention of the Sheriff who kept a close watch of all movements. To avoid suspicion, walked to Sister Durphy’s and waited the arrival of the carriage. which passed off down the with and , with raised curtains, receiving by the way, without any discovery, by the Sheriff. when about four miles down the the carriage turned on the the Prairie and passing round the turned into the Timber opposite Wiggan’s farm. when alighted and walked to ’s and the carriage returned. I was in good Spirits although somewhat afflicted in body, and was much rejoiced to meet my dear once more.
A report came over the that “there are several small companies of Men in , , &c in search of Joseph, they saw his horse go down the yesterday and were confident he was on that side. They swear they will have him. It is said there is a reward of thirteen hundred dollars offered for the apprehnesion and delivery of Joseph and , and this is supposed to have induced them to make search. [blank] The Sheriff and Deputy have uttered heavy [p. 1365]
Page 1365