History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<December 9> not Mr. Speaker, detain you or this honorable body much longer. I am heartily sorry that a blow has been aimed at the chartered privileges of . I speak in defence of my Constituents upon this occasion; feeling myself bound to do so, not by any former pledges, but by principle. I believe in defending the cause of the defenceless. As has already been remarked, all that we claim is equal rights and equal provisions. I would remark for the satisfaction of my own feelings in this matter, that I was some little interested in the event of the last election, I then was engaged in the cause of democracy, enlisted in the campaign of canvassing my , and in consequence of the many prejudices that were excited against the Mormons as they are called, I was placed under circumstances of most unparalleled embarrassment. But still I thought it a favorable opportunity to unite the democracy of the . I know that considerable political <Capital> has been made by the question of Mormonism and anti-Mormonism Perhaps one thing that now contributes to that result is that there are hints in the ’s message in regard to a repeal of the Charter. It is a circumstance within my own knowledge, that previous to the last election in that some few individuals there made strong efforts to get our votes for the ’s election. By exertions made there more than a thousand votes were cast for the by Mormon influence and since I have been here, a gentleman, of the opposite politics, has said to me “now your is paying you off”. I do not allude to this to wound the feelings of any person whatever. I do not consider that the recommendation of the was designed to effect the repeal of our Charter. All that we have to say is that we throw ourselves upon your mercy. As democrats we ask for equal justice and equal rights. Give us those rights and we are content; without them, we are deprived of that which was purchased by the blood of our fathers.[”]
10 December 1842 • Saturday
<10.> Saturday 10. In this day’s paper, gave his valedictory, resigning the Editorship of the Wasp to Mr. .
13 December 1842 • Tuesday
<13.> Tuesday 13. I continued to chop and haul wood and attend to my domestic concerns. my delegation arrived at about 3 o’clock this P. M. <afternoon> and found the repeal of the Charter in a high state of agitation in the Legislature.
14 December 1842 • Wednesday
<14.> Wednesday 14. My delegation at having made Affidavit that I was in on the 6th. of May last, and consequently could not have been concerned in the attempted assassination of , and also having prepared a petition to to revoke the writ, and proclamation of for my arrest. called on at 4 in P. M. <the> afternoon by their own selection— namely— ,—— , Elders and , in company with District Attorney, who read his communication to Esqre. of the 20th. October; my petition to revoke and countermand ’s writ and proclamation; and the affidavit of . in reply stated that he had no doubt, but that the writ of was illegal, but he doubted as to his authority to interfere with the acts of his predecessor. He finally concluded that he would state the case before the Judges of the Supreme Court at their counsel next day, and whatever they decided on shall be his decision. He then stated his reasons for recommending a repeal of the Charter and said that he regretted, that he had not recommended a repeal of all the Charters in the .
15 December 1842 • Thursday
<15> Thursday 15. My delegates at continued to prosecute my discharge— on the 16th. received his discharge in case of Bankruptcy. Every arrangement [p. 1427]
December 9 not Mr. Speaker, detain you or this honorable body much longer. I am heartily sorry that a blow has been aimed at the chartered privileges of . I speak in defence of my Constituents upon this occasion; feeling myself bound to do so, not by any former pledges, but by principle. I believe in defending the cause of the defenceless. As has already been remarked, all that we claim is equal rights and equal provisions. I would remark for the satisfaction of my own feelings in this matter, that I was some little interested in the event of the last election, I then was engaged in the cause of democracy, enlisted in the campaign of canvassing my , and in consequence of the many prejudices that were excited against the Mormons as they are called, I was placed under circumstances of most unparalleled embarrassment. But still I thought it a favorable opportunity to unite the democracy of the . I know that considerable political Capital has been made by the question of Mormonism and anti-Mormonism Perhaps one thing that now contributes to that result is that there are hints in the ’s message in regard to a repeal of the Charter. It is a circumstance within my own knowledge, that previous to the last election in that some few individuals there made strong efforts to get our votes for the ’s election. By exertions made there more than a thousand votes were cast for the by Mormon influence and since I have been here, a gentleman, of the opposite politics, has said to me “now your is paying you off”. I do not allude to this to wound the feelings of any person whatever. I do not consider that the recommendation of the was designed to effect the repeal of our Charter. All that we have to say is that we throw ourselves upon your mercy. As democrats we ask for equal justice and equal rights. Give us those rights and we are content; without them, we are deprived of that which was purchased by the blood of our fathers.”
10 December 1842 • Saturday
10. Saturday 10. In this day’s paper, gave his valedictory, resigning the Editorship of the Wasp to Mr. .
13 December 1842 • Tuesday
13. Tuesday 13. I continued to chop and haul wood and attend to my domestic concerns. my delegation arrived at about 3 o’clock this afternoon and found the repeal of the Charter in a high state of agitation in the Legislature.
14 December 1842 • Wednesday
14. Wednesday 14. My delegation at having made Affidavit that I was in on the 6th. of May last, and consequently could not have been concerned in the attempted assassination of , and also having prepared a petition to to revoke the writ, and proclamation of for my arrest. called on at 4 in the afternoon by their own selection— namely— ,—— , Elders and , in company with District Attorney, who read his communication to Esqre. of the 20th. October; my petition to revoke and countermand ’s writ and proclamation; and the affidavit of . in reply stated that he had no doubt, but that the writ of was illegal, but he doubted as to his authority to interfere with the acts of his predecessor. He finally concluded that he would state the case before the Judges of the Supreme Court at their counsel next day, and whatever they decided on shall be his decision. He then stated his reasons for recommending a repeal of the Charter and said that he regretted, that he had not recommended a repeal of all the Charters in the .
15 December 1842 • Thursday
15 Thursday 15. My delegates at continued to prosecute my discharge— on the 16th. received his discharge in case of Bankruptcy. Every arrangement [p. 1427]
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