History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1467
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11 February 1843 • Saturday
<February 11> Saturday 11. This day had an interview with and his family. They expressed a willingness to be saved. Good feelings prevailed and we again shook hands together. At ten oclock attended the City Council. I prophesied to , City Recorder, that it would be better for him ten years hence not to say any thing more about fees; and addressed the new Council urging the necessity of their acting upon the principle of liberality, and of relieving the from all unnecessary expences and burdens, and not attempt to improve the , but enact such ordinances as would promote peace and good order, and the people would improve the . Capitalists would come in from all quarters and build Mills, Factories, and Machinery of all kinds, New buildings would arise on every hand, and would become a great . I prophecied that if the Council would be liberal in their proceedings, they would become rich, and spoke against the principle of pay for every little service rendered, and especially of Committees having extra pay for their services; reproved the Judges of the late election for not holding the Polls open after six o’clock when there were many wishing to vote— Dr. took an active part in electioneering for the [blank] opposition ticket, and obstructing the passage to the Polls. The Council elected , City Recorder, , Marshall; , Treasurer; approved as Mayor’s Clerk; , William D. Huntington, Lewis Robison, and , Constables; , Surveyor; James Allred, Supervisor of Streets; [HC 5:270], Coroner; , Notary Public; , Weigher and Sealer; , Market Master; , Fire Warden; , City Attorney; and , Market Inspector for the . A board of health was established to consist of Joseph Smith, , , and . The Council resolved that a market be established in the — it was proposed to build two markets, but I told the Council that if we began too large we should do nothing, we had better build a small one at once, to be holden by the Corporation, and if that would support itself we could go on to build another on a larger scale: That the Council should hold an influence over that prices of markets so that the poor should not be oppressed, and that the Mechanic should not oppress the Farmer: that the upper part of the Town had no right to rival those on the . Here on the bank of the was where we first pitched our tents: here was where the first sickness and deaths occurred; here has been the greatest suffering in the ; we have been the making of the upper part of the , we have located by [blank] the <on the hill> and they ought to be satisfied. We began here first, and let the market go out from this part of the , let the upper part of the be marketed by Waggons until they can build a market, and the let the first market be established on the rising ground on Main Street about a quarter of a mile north of the — Council continued thro’ the day.
[blank] came to my house to live.
Elders and wrote <notifying him> to come to , <according to the decision of Council and answer to charges of adultery which had been preferred against him before the First Presidency.>
12 February 1843 • Sunday
<12> Sunday 12. Seven or Eight young men came to see me, part of them from the City of . They [HC 5:271] treated me with the greatest respect— I showed them the fallacy of Mr. Miller’s data concerning the coming of Christ and the end of the world, or as is commonly called Millerism, and preached them quite a sermon— That error was in the bible, or the translation of the bible— that Miller was in want of correct information upon the subject, and that he was not so much to blame as the translators. I told them the prophecies must all be fulfilled, the Sun must be darkened, and the Moon turned into blood, and many more things before [p. 1467]
11 February 1843 • Saturday
February 11 Saturday 11. This day had an interview with and his family. They expressed a willingness to be saved. Good feelings prevailed and we again shook hands together. At ten oclock attended the City Council. I prophesied to , City Recorder, that it would be better for him ten years hence not to say any thing more about fees; and addressed the new Council urging the necessity of their acting upon the principle of liberality, and of relieving the from all unnecessary expences and burdens, and not attempt to improve the , but enact such ordinances as would promote peace and good order, and the people would improve the . Capitalists would come in from all quarters and build Mills, Factories, and Machinery of all kinds, New buildings would arise on every hand, and would become a great . I prophecied that if the Council would be liberal in their proceedings, they would become rich, and spoke against the principle of pay for every little service rendered, and especially of Committees having extra pay for their services; reproved the Judges of the late election for not holding the Polls open after six o’clock when there were many wishing to vote— Dr. took an active part in electioneering for the [blank] opposition ticket, and obstructing the passage to the Polls. The Council elected , City Recorder, , Marshall; , Treasurer; approved as Mayor’s Clerk; , William D. Huntington, Lewis Robison, and , Constables; , Surveyor; James Allred, Supervisor of Streets; [HC 5:270], Coroner; , Notary Public; , Weigher and Sealer; , Market Master; , Fire Warden; , City Attorney; and , Market Inspector for the . A board of health was established to consist of Joseph Smith, , , and . The Council resolved that a market be established in the — it was proposed to build two markets, but I told the Council that if we began too large we should do nothing, we had better build a small one at once, to be holden by the Corporation, and if that would support itself we could go on to build another on a larger scale: That the Council should hold an influence over that prices of markets so that the poor should not be oppressed, and that the Mechanic should not oppress the Farmer: that the upper part of the Town had no right to rival those on the . Here on the bank of the was where we first pitched our tents: here was where the first sickness and deaths occurred; here has been the greatest suffering in the ; we have been the making of the upper part of the , we have located [blank] the on the hill and they ought to be satisfied. We began here first, and let the market go out from this part of the , let the upper part of the be marketed by Waggons until they can build a market, and the let the first market be established on the rising ground on Main Street about a quarter of a mile north of the — Council continued thro’ the day.
[blank] came to my house to live.
Elders and wrote notifying him to come to , according to the decision of Council and answer to charges of adultery which had been preferred against him before the First Presidency.
12 February 1843 • Sunday
12 Sunday 12. Seven or Eight young men came to see me, part of them from the City of . They [HC 5:271] treated me with the greatest respect— I showed them the fallacy of Mr. Miller’s data concerning the coming of Christ and the end of the world, or as is commonly called Millerism, and preached them quite a sermon— That error was in the bible, or the translation of the bible— that Miller was in want of correct information upon the subject, and that he was not so much to blame as the translators. I told them the prophecies must all be fulfilled, the Sun must be darkened, and the Moon turned into blood, and many more things before [p. 1467]
Page 1467