History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1532
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<April 13> Closed by singing and prayer.
After meeting many of the Saints repaired to the landing at the ; the Steamer “Maid of Iowa” arrived during meeting from , where it went last night after the freight which it left to enable it to get over the rapids.
I was among them until about 3 o’clock, when the boat left, I walked with .
18 vessels wrecked on the Irish Coast, by the Easterly winds.
The Gunpowder Mills at Waltham Abbey, exploded, killing seven persons.
The Siamese Twins Chang and Eng, married the two sisters Sarah and Adelaide Yeates, of Wilkes County, North Carolina.
14 April 1843 • Friday
<14> Rode out to my and to the Pra<i>rie, with some of the Emigrants; sold 20 acres of land and when I was again riding out in the evening, broke the Carriage on the side hill, when we all returned home on foot.
I give the following speech entire, as copied from the National Intelligencer, as a specimen of the way the seed of Joseph are being “wasted before the Gentiles.”
Speech of Colonel Cobb.
Head Mingo of the Choctaws, East of the , in reply to the Agent of the Brother: We have heard you talk as from the lips of our Father, the great White Chief at , and my people have called upon me to speak to you, The red man has no books, and when he wishes to make known his views, like his fathers before him, he speaks from his mouth. He is afraid of writing— When he speaks, he knows what he says; the Great Spirit hears him. Writing is the invention of the pale faces; it gives birth to error and to fends. The Great Spirit talks— we hear him in the thunder— in the rushing winds and the mighty waters— but he never writes.
Brother: When you were young we were strong; we fought by your side; but our arms are now broken. You have grown large. My people have become small.
Brother: My voice is weak; you can scarcely hear me; it is not the shout of a warrior, but the bewail of an infant. I have lost it in mourning for the misfortunes of my people.— These are their graves, and in those aged pines you hear the ghosts of the departed. Their ashes are here, and we have been left to protect them. Our warriors are nearly all gone to the far country West; but here are our dead. Shall we go too, and give their bones to the wolves?
Brother: Two sleeps have passed since we heard you talk. We have thought upon it— You ask us to leave our country, and tell us it is our father’s wish. We would not desire to displease our father. We respect him, and you his child. But the Choctaw always thinks We want time to answer.
Brother: Our hearts are full. Twelve winters ago our chiefs sold our country. Every warrior that you see here was opposed to the treaty. If the dead could have been counted, it could never have been made; but, alas! though they stood around, they could not be seen or heard. Their tears came in the rain drops, and their voices in the wailing wind, but the pale faces knew it not, and our land was taken away. [p. 1532]
April 13 Closed by singing and prayer.
After meeting many of the Saints repaired to the landing at the ; the Steamer “Maid of Iowa” arrived during meeting from , where it went last night after the freight which it left to enable it to get over the rapids.
I was among them until about 3 o’clock, when the boat left, I walked with .
18 vessels wrecked on the Irish Coast, by the Easterly winds.
The Gunpowder Mills at Waltham Abbey, exploded, killing seven persons.
The Siamese Twins Chang and Eng, married the two sisters Sarah and Adelaide Yeates, of Wilkes County, North Carolina.
14 April 1843 • Friday
14 Rode out to my and to the Prairie, with some of the Emigrants; sold 20 acres of land and when I was again riding out in the evening, broke the Carriage on the side hill, when we all returned home on foot.
I give the following speech entire, as copied from the National Intelligencer, as a specimen of the way the seed of Joseph are being “wasted before the Gentiles.”
Speech of Colonel Cobb.
Head Mingo of the Choctaws, East of the , in reply to the Agent of the Brother: We have heard you talk as from the lips of our Father, the great White Chief at , and my people have called upon me to speak to you, The red man has no books, and when he wishes to make known his views, like his fathers before him, he speaks from his mouth. He is afraid of writing— When he speaks, he knows what he says; the Great Spirit hears him. Writing is the invention of the pale faces; it gives birth to error and to fends. The Great Spirit talks— we hear him in the thunder— in the rushing winds and the mighty waters— but he never writes.
Brother: When you were young we were strong; we fought by your side; but our arms are now broken. You have grown large. My people have become small.
Brother: My voice is weak; you can scarcely hear me; it is not the shout of a warrior, but the bewail of an infant. I have lost it in mourning for the misfortunes of my people.— These are their graves, and in those aged pines you hear the ghosts of the departed. Their ashes are here, and we have been left to protect them. Our warriors are nearly all gone to the far country West; but here are our dead. Shall we go too, and give their bones to the wolves?
Brother: Two sleeps have passed since we heard you talk. We have thought upon it— You ask us to leave our country, and tell us it is our father’s wish. We would not desire to displease our father. We respect him, and you his child. But the Choctaw always thinks We want time to answer.
Brother: Our hearts are full. Twelve winters ago our chiefs sold our country. Every warrior that you see here was opposed to the treaty. If the dead could have been counted, it could never have been made; but, alas! though they stood around, they could not be seen or heard. Their tears came in the rain drops, and their voices in the wailing wind, but the pale faces knew it not, and our land was taken away. [p. 1532]
Page 1532