History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1385
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<August 24> “would not advise Mr. Smith ever trust himself in .” I can only say as I have heretofore said on many occasions that I never have entertained a doubt that if Mr. Smith should submit to the laws of , that the utmost latitude would be allowed him in his defence, and the fullest justice done him and I only intended to refer (in the remark made to you when at my house) to the rabble— and not to the laws of .
Very much has been attributed to me in reference to General Smith that is without foundation in truth, a knowledge of which fact, enables me to receive what I hear as coming from him, with great allowance; In conclusion Dear I feel conscious when I assure you, that all my official acts in reference to Mr. Smith have been prompted by a strict sense of duty, and in discharge of that duty have studiously pursued that course, least— likely to produce an excitement and alarm, both in your community, and the surrounding public, and I will here add that I much regret being called upon to act at all, and that I hope he will submit to the laws, and that justice will ultimately be done. Be pleased to present my best respects to , and your Companions when at , and accept of my highest regard for yourself, and best wishes for your prosperity and happiness— Your obedt. servant— To Mrs. .[”]
26 August 1842 • Friday
<26> Friday 26. At home all day. <In the> evening in Council with some of the Twelve and others. I gave some important instructions upon the situation of the Church, showing that it was necessary, that the officers who could, should go abroad through the States; and inasmuch as a great [HC 5:131] excitement had been raised, through the community at large, by the falsehoods put in circulation by and others, it was wisdom in God that the Elders should go forth and deluge the States with a flood of truth; setting forth the mean, contemptible persecuting conduct of of , and those connected—— with him in his <mean and> corrupt proceedings, in plain terms, so that the world might understand the abusive conduct of our enemies, and stamp it with indignation. I advised the Twelve to call a special Conference on Monday next to give instructions to the Elders, and call upon them to go forth upon this important mission, meantime, that all the Affidavits concerning ’s conduct be taken and printed, so that each Elder could be properly furnished with correct and weighty testimony to lay before the public.
Great distress prevails in on account of the dull state of Trade.
27 August 1842 • Saturday
<27> Saturday 27. In the assembly room with some of the Twelve, and others, who were preparing affidavits for the press.
. Augt. 27. 1842. To his Excellency— — Dear Sir, I received your letter of the 24th. in due time, and now tender you the sincere gratitude of my heart, for the interest which you have felt in my peace and prosperity; and I assure you, that every act of kindness, and every word of consolation have been thankfully received and duly appreciated by me and my friends also; and I much regret your ill health, and still hope that you will avail yourself of sufficient time to investigate our cause, and thoroughly acquaint yourself with the illegality of the persecution instituted against Mr. Smith— And I now certify that Mr. Smith, [p. 1385]
August 24 “would not advise Mr. Smith ever trust himself in .” I can only say as I have heretofore said on many occasions that I never have entertained a doubt that if Mr. Smith should submit to the laws of , that the utmost latitude would be allowed him in his defence, and the fullest justice done him and I only intended to refer (in the remark made to you when at my house) to the rabble— and not to the laws of .
Very much has been attributed to me in reference to General Smith that is without foundation in truth, a knowledge of which fact, enables me to receive what I hear as coming from him, with great allowance; In conclusion Dear I feel conscious when I assure you, that all my official acts in reference to Mr. Smith have been prompted by a strict sense of duty, and in discharge of that duty have studiously pursued that course, least— likely to produce excitement and alarm, both in your community, and the surrounding public, and I will here add that I much regret being called upon to act at all, and that I hope he will submit to the laws, and that justice will ultimately be done. Be pleased to present my best respects to , and your Companions when at , and accept of my highest regard for yourself, and best wishes for your prosperity and happiness— Your obedt. servant— To Mrs. .”
26 August 1842 • Friday
26 Friday 26. At home all day. In the evening in Council with some of the Twelve and others. I gave some important instructions upon the situation of the Church, showing that it was necessary, that the officers who could, should go abroad through the States; and inasmuch as a great [HC 5:131] excitement had been raised, through the community at large, by the falsehoods put in circulation by and others, it was wisdom in God that the Elders should go forth and deluge the States with a flood of truth; setting forth the mean, contemptible persecuting conduct of of , and those connected—— with him in his mean and corrupt proceedings, in plain terms, so that the world might understand the abusive conduct of our enemies, and stamp it with indignation. I advised the Twelve to call a special Conference on Monday next to give instructions to the Elders, and call upon them to go forth upon this important mission, meantime, that all the Affidavits concerning ’s conduct be taken and printed, so that each Elder could be properly furnished with correct and weighty testimony to lay before the public.
Great distress prevails in on account of the dull state of Trade.
27 August 1842 • Saturday
27 Saturday 27. In the assembly room with some of the Twelve, and others, who were preparing affidavits for the press.
. Augt. 27. 1842. To his Excellency— — Dear Sir, I received your letter of the 24th. in due time, and now tender you the sincere gratitude of my heart, for the interest which you have felt in my peace and prosperity; and I assure you, that every act of kindness, and every word of consolation have been thankfully received and duly appreciated by me and my friends also; and I much regret your ill health, and still hope that you will avail yourself of sufficient time to investigate our cause, and thoroughly acquaint yourself with the illegality of the persecution instituted against Mr. Smith— And I now certify that Mr. Smith, [p. 1385]
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