History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<November 28> acted as Council for Defendants, and Elder for the accusers.  The hearing of testimony lasted until about four oclock, at which time the meeting adjourned  for half an hour. On coming together again addressed the brethren at  some length showing the important responsibility of the Committee, also the many  difficulties they had to contend with. He advised the brethren to have charity one with  another and be united &c &c replied to ’s remarks.   explained some remarks before made. Elder made  a few pointed remarks, after which I gave my decision, which was that the Committee  stand in their place as before. I likewise shewed the brethren that I was responsible  to the for a faithful performance of my office as sole Trustee in Trust &c and  the Temple Committee were responsible to me, and had given bonds to me, to the  amount of $12000 for a faithful discharge of all duties devolving upon them as a  Committee &c &c The trial did not conclude until about nine o’clock in the evening.
29 November 1842 • Tuesday
<29.> Tuesday 29. In council with , , and others,  concerning Bankruptcy— Afternoon attended Court at the trial of Mr. Hunter <Grocer> before Alderman  [Asa] Spencer for slander. I forgave Hunter the judgment but he was fined $10. for contempt  of Court.
30 November 1842 • Wednesday
<30.> Wednesday 30. A. M. Morning In Council in the large Assembly Room preparing evidence  in the case of Bankruptcy. P. M. <Afternoon> had brought before the Municipal Court  for slander, but in consequence of the informality of the writ drawn by Esqre. ,  I was nonsuited.
A severe storm of snow, rain, and wind, is reported to have been experienced  at this day and evening, doing much damage to the Ships and Wharves.
1 December 1842 • Thursday
<December 1> Thursday December 1. 1842 was sick which occupied some of my time.  visited and who were sick. Called at s, in  company with , to give some Council concerning a sick sister, called  on to get the historical documents &c after which I commenced  reading and revising history.
Extract of a letter from — Superscribed to dated   December 1. 1842 whither he had gone to escape the hands of those who  sought his life in
“Dear brother Joseph Smith— I am requested by our friend  , to drop a few lines informing you that he is in this place, his Health is good.  but his Spirits are depressed, caused by his being unable to obtain employment of any  kind he has applied in different parts of the and Country, but all without  success— as Farmer’s can get persons to work from sunrise till dark— for merely what  they eat— he is most anxious to hear from you– and wishes you to see his Mother  and Children— and write all particulars, how matters and things are, and what the  prospects are— I pity him from the bottom of my heart— his lot in life seems marked  with sorrow, bitterness, and care— he is a noble generous friend— but you know his worth!  any comments from me would be superfluous. he will wait in this place until he hears  from you— please write immediately as ’twill be a source of great comfort to him to hear,  if Joseph is not at home— will be kind enough to write— he says every  other one he has come across has been afraid of their shadows, but he watches them well  he comes to see me every day— and I keep him a close Prisoner! but he does not complain  of my cruelty, or being hard hearted, but when with me seems resigned to whatever punishment [p. 1423]
November 28 acted as Council for Defendants, and Elder for the accusers. The hearing of testimony lasted until about four oclock, at which time the meeting adjourned for half an hour. On coming together again addressed the brethren at some length showing the important responsibility of the Committee, also the many difficulties they had to contend with. He advised the brethren to have charity one with another and be united &c &c replied to ’s remarks. explained some remarks before made. Elder made a few pointed remarks, after which I gave my decision, which was that the Committee stand in their place as before. I likewise shewed the brethren that I was responsible to the for a faithful performance of my office as sole Trustee in Trust &c and the Temple Committee were responsible to me, and had given bonds to me, to the amount of $12000 for a faithful discharge of all duties devolving upon them as a Committee &c &c The trial did not conclude until about nine o’clock in the evening.
29 November 1842 • Tuesday
29. Tuesday 29. In council with , , and others, concerning Bankruptcy— Afternoon attended Court at the trial of Mr. Hunter Grocer before Alderman Asa Spencer for slander. I forgave Hunter the judgment but he was fined $10. for contempt of Court.
30 November 1842 • Wednesday
30. Wednesday 30. Morning In Council in the large Assembly Room preparing evidence in the case of Bankruptcy. Afternoon had brought before the Municipal Court for slander, but in consequence of the informality of the writ drawn by Esqre. , I was nonsuited.
A severe storm of snow, rain, and wind, is reported to have been experienced at this day and evening, doing much damage to the Ships and Wharves.
1 December 1842 • Thursday
December 1 Thursday December 1. 1842 was sick which occupied some of my time. visited and who were sick. Called at s, in company with , to give some Council concerning a sick sister, called on to get the historical documents &c after which I commenced reading and revising history.
Extract of a letter from — Superscribed to dated December 1. 1842 whither he had gone to escape the hands of those who sought his life in
“Dear brother Joseph Smith— I am requested by our friend , to drop a few lines informing you that he is in this place, his Health is good. but his Spirits are depressed, caused by his being unable to obtain employment of any kind he has applied in different parts of the and Country, but all without success— as Farmer’s can get persons to work from sunrise till dark— for merely what they eat— he is most anxious to hear from you– and wishes you to see his Mother and Children— and write all particulars, how matters and things are, and what the prospects are— I pity him from the bottom of my heart— his lot in life seems marked with sorrow, bitterness, and care— he is a noble generous friend— but you know his worth! any comments from me would be superfluous. he will wait in this place until he hears from you— please write immediately as ’twill be a source of great comfort to him to hear, if Joseph is not at home— will be kind enough to write— he says every other one he has come across has been afraid of their shadows, but he watches them well he comes to see me every day— and I keep him a close Prisoner! but he does not complain of my cruelty, or being hard hearted, but when with me seems resigned to whatever punishment [p. 1423]
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