History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1547
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6 May 1843 • Saturday
<May 6> In the morning had an interview with a lecturer on Mesmerism and  Phrenology. Objected to his performing in the . Also an interview with a Methodist  Preacher, and conversed about his God without body or parts
At 9½ A.M. I mounted with my staff, and with the band and about a  dozen ladies led by , <and> proceeded to the general Parade Ground of the Nauvoo  Legion, east of my on the Prairie. The Legion looked well, better than on any  former occasion; and they performed their evolusions in admirable style.
The officers did honor to the Legion, many of them were equipped, and armed  cap-a-pie. The men were in good spirits,< they> had made great improvements, both in uniform  and discipline, and we felt proud to be associated with a body of men which in point of  discipline, uniform, appearance and a knowledge of military tactics, are the pride of ,  one of its strongest defences, and a great bulwark of the western country.
In the course of my remarks on the Pra<i>rie I told the Legion, <that> when we have  petitioned those in power for assistance, they have always told us they had no power to  help us, damn such Traitors— when they give me <the> power to protect the innocent, I will never  say I can do nothing for their good, I will exercise that power. So help me God. At the  close of the address the Legion marched to the and disbanded in Main Street  about 2 P.M. <the day> being windy and very cold. There were two Officers  and of , present, who expressed great satisfaction at our appearance  and evolutions.
In the evening, attended Mr Vickers performance of Wire Dancing, Legerdemain  Magic &c. &c.
A conference was held at Toulon, Stark County, ; 5 branches, 17 Elders  3 Priests, 4 Teachers, 2 Deacons and 129 members were represented. A branch has  been recently organized at Lyons, , New York, consisting of 2 Elders, 1 Priest  1 Teacher and 22 members
7 May 1843 • Sunday
<7> Sunday. In the forenoon I was visited by several Gentlemen, concerning  the plates, which were dug out near Kinderhook.
The Council of the First Presidency met
Elder preached at
8 May 1843 • Monday
<8> I called at <the> at 7 a.M. with a supersedeas to stay suit Thompson vs  Dixon.
<was unwilling> to give sister Mulholland one fourth of the  lot as directed by me.
9 May 1843 • Tuesday
<9> In company with my , , and my adult family,  , , , and about one hundred Gentlemen and Ladies,  started 10 min: before 8 A.M. from the Nauvoo dock, under a salute of Cannon: having  on board a fine band of Music. We had an excellent address from our esteemed friend  ; the band performed its part well: much good humor and hilarity prevailed. The  Captain and officers on board did all they could to make us comfortable, and we had a very  agreeable and pleasant trip. We started with the intention of visiting , but in  consequence of the lowness of Skunk river, it was impracticable, we therefore altered our course  to , touching at Fort Madison, on our way up, and at Shokoquon on our return.
<In consequence of the of having refused to withdraw a writ, reported to have been issued on a demand from the of on the same charge as that for which  I had been discharged by , I dispensed with the pleasure of calling upon my friends at or Fort Madison. During our stay at those places, I kept myself concealed on the boat>  The Maid of Iowa did well, her accommodations are good, for the size of the [p. 1547]
6 May 1843 • Saturday
May 6 In the morning had an interview with a lecturer on Mesmerism and Phrenology. Objected to his performing in the . Also an interview with a Methodist Preacher, and conversed about his God without body or parts
At 9½ A.M. I mounted with my staff, and with the band and about a dozen ladies led by , and proceeded to the general Parade Ground of the Nauvoo Legion, east of my on the Prairie. The Legion looked well, better than on any former occasion; and they performed their evolusions in admirable style.
The officers did honor to the Legion, many of them were equipped, and armed cap-a-pie. The men were in good spirits, they had made great improvements, both in uniform and discipline, and we felt proud to be associated with a body of men which in point of discipline, uniform, appearance and a knowledge of military tactics, are the pride of , one of its strongest defences, and a great bulwark of the western country.
In the course of my remarks on the Prairie I told the Legion, that when we have petitioned those in power for assistance, they have always told us they had no power to help us, damn such Traitors— when they give me the power to protect the innocent, I will never say I can do nothing for their good, I will exercise that power. So help me God. At the close of the address the Legion marched to the and disbanded in Main Street about 2 P.M. the day being windy and very cold. There were two Officers and of , present, who expressed great satisfaction at our appearance and evolutions.
In the evening, attended Mr Vickers performance of Wire Dancing, Legerdemain Magic &c. &c.
A conference was held at Toulon, Stark County, ; 5 branches, 17 Elders 3 Priests, 4 Teachers, 2 Deacons and 129 members were represented. A branch has been recently organized at Lyons, , New York, consisting of 2 Elders, 1 Priest 1 Teacher and 22 members
7 May 1843 • Sunday
7 Sunday. In the forenoon I was visited by several Gentlemen, concerning the plates, which were dug out near Kinderhook.
The Council of the First Presidency met
Elder preached at
8 May 1843 • Monday
8 I called at the at 7 a.M. with a supersedeas to stay suit Thompson Dixon.
was unwilling to give sister Mulholland one fourth of the lot as directed by me.
9 May 1843 • Tuesday
9 In company with my , , and my adult family, , , , and about one hundred Gentlemen and Ladies, started 10 min: before 8 A.M. from the Nauvoo dock, under a salute of Cannon: having on board a fine band of Music. We had an excellent address from our esteemed friend ; the band performed its part well: much good humor and hilarity prevailed. The Captain and officers on board did all they could to make us comfortable, and we had a very agreeable and pleasant trip. We started with the intention of visiting , but in consequence of the lowness of Skunk river, it was impracticable, we therefore altered our course to , touching at Fort Madison, on our way up, and at Shokoquon on our return.
In consequence of the of having refused to withdraw a writ, reported to have been issued on a demand from the of on the same charge as that for which I had been discharged by , I dispensed with the pleasure of calling upon my friends at or Fort Madison. During our stay at those places, I kept myself concealed on the boat The Maid of Iowa did well, her accommodations are good, for the size of the [p. 1547]
Page 1547