History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1587
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<June 26> for tresspass, and held him to bail, which he was unable to procure, which circumstance lowered his tune a littl: and thus finally, to day, have left for , in search of .
The severe treatment of the General, together with his pleasing deportment and egnanimity under all his trials, have made him many friends and created almost universal sympathy. Persecution or oppression always helps the cause of the persecuted and oppressed, whether their cause is right or wrong. In haste yours G.”
From we travelled about 40 miles and staid for the night at a Farm house. rode to Genesseo with my letter and staid all night.
27 June 1843 • Tuesday
<27> I started with the Company and took dinner at Gennesseo, about 2 p.m. we resumed our journey, while crossing Fox river I requested to give me the privilege of riding on horseback, which he refused; but by the intercession of Sheriff Campbell and Mr. took my seat in the Stage Coach and I his, in the buggy with Mr. Montgomery Son in Law, and Law student of , in about two miles we met Peter W Conover and , and shook hands with both of them at the same time, and could not refrain from tears at seeing the first of my friends come to meet me, and then said to Mr. Montgomery “I am not going to this time. These are my boys”. I next enquired how many were with them and was answered there was ten started, but they had sent one with my letter to and two to Monmouth; [HC 5:449] while we were talking, with Captain and the other five Brethren then rode up, at the same time the Company who started with me from rode up, I then said to — “now I can have the privilege of riding <old> Joe Duncan” and mounted my favorite horse, and the entire Company then rode towards a farm house where we made a halt. and who trembled much, then rode up to Conover who was an old acquaintance of ’s— when Conover asked “what is the matter with you, have you got the ague.” replied “no”. asked “is Jim Flack in the crowd” and was answered “he is not now, but you will see him to morrow, about this time.” then said “I am a dead man, for I know him of old”, Conover told him not to be frightened, <for he would> not be hurt. stood trembling like an aspen leaf, when walked up to him, and shook hands with him. said “do I meet you as a friend? I expected to be a dead man when I met you again” replied “we are friends, except in Law, that must have its course. The Company moved on to Andover, where the Sheriff of requested lodgings for the night for all the Company. I was put into a room and locked up with , it was reported to me that some of the Brethren had been drinking whiskey that day in violation of the word of wisdom. I called the Brethren in, and investigated the case, and was satisfied that no evil had been done. [p. 1587]
June 26 for tresspass, and held him to bail, which he was unable to procure, which circumstance lowered his tune a littl: and thus finally, to day, have left for , in search of .
The severe treatment of the General, together with his pleasing deportment and egnanimity under all his trials, have made him many friends and created almost universal sympathy. Persecution or oppression always helps the cause of the persecuted and oppressed, whether their cause is right or wrong. In haste yours G.”
From we travelled about 40 miles and staid for the night at a Farm house. rode to Genesseo with my letter and staid all night.
27 June 1843 • Tuesday
27 I started with the Company and took dinner at Gennesseo, about 2 p.m. we resumed our journey, while crossing Fox river I requested to give me the privilege of riding on horseback, which he refused; but by the intercession of Sheriff Campbell and Mr. took my seat in the Stage Coach and I his, in the buggy with Mr. Montgomery Son in Law, and Law student of , in about two miles we met Peter W Conover and , and shook hands with both of them at the same time, and could not refrain from tears at seeing the first of my friends come to meet me, and then said to Mr. Montgomery “I am not going to this time. These are my boys”. I next enquired how many were with them and was answered there was ten started, but they had sent one with my letter to and two to Monmouth; [HC 5:449] while we were talking, with Captain and the other five Brethren rode up, at the same time the Company who started with me from rode up, I then said to — “now I can have the privilege of riding old Joe Duncan” and mounted my favorite horse, and the entire Company then rode towards a farm house where we made a halt. and who trembled much, then rode up to Conover who was an old acquaintance of ’s— when Conover asked “what is the matter with you, have you got the ague.” replied “no”. asked “is Jim Flack in the crowd” and was answered “he is not now, but you will see him to morrow, about this time.” then said “I am a dead man, for I know him of old”, Conover told him not to be frightened, for he would not be hurt. stood trembling like an aspen leaf, when walked up to him, and shook hands with him. said “do I meet you as a friend? I expected to be a dead man when I met you again” replied “we are friends, except in Law, that must have its course. The Company moved on to Andover, where the Sheriff of requested lodgings for the night for all the Company. I was put into a room and locked up with , it was reported to me that some of the Brethren had been drinking whiskey that day in violation of the word of wisdom. I called the Brethren in, and investigated the case, and was satisfied that no evil had been done. [p. 1587]
Page 1587