History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1364
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<August 8> of no force of effect, and the Prisoner or Prisoners shall be released and discharged therefrom
Sec 3. And be it also further ordained, that in the absence, sickness, debility, or other—— circumstances disqualifying or preventing the Mayor from officiating in his office, as Chief Justice of the Municipal Court, the Alderman present shall appoint one from—— amongst them to act as Chief Justice, or president pro tempore.
Sec. 4. This ordinance to take effect and be in force from and after its passage. Passed August 8. 1842. Vice Mayor and President pro tempore— Recorder—
A disgraceful and bloody <riot> occurred at this evening, in and about the “Sans Souci House.”
9 August 1842 • Tuesday
<9> Tuesday 9. In company with and , preparing for the return of the Sheriff; prepared a Writ of Habeas Corpus from the Master in Chancery.
10 August 1842 • Wednesday
<10> Wednesday 10. The Deputy Sheriff returned to , but I was absent, and he did not see me, or . He endeavored to alarm my , and the brethren with his threats, if I was not forthcoming, but they understood the law in such cases and his threats proved harmless.
11 August 1842 • Thursday
<11> Thursday 11. This forenoon Brother entered into conversation with <>, upon the illegality of the whole proceedings in reference to the arrest. when the acknowledged that he believed Joseph was innocent and that ’s course which he had pursued was unjustifiable and illegal. I spent the day at Uncle ’s in and sent word that I wished to see —— , brothers , and others, with instructions to meet me on the between and . After dark, , , , , , and met at the Water side near the and proceeded in a Skiff between the , until they arrived near the lower end; and then hailed to shore. after waiting a very little while the skiff arrived from the opposite shore, and in it were myself and brother . A council was then held in the Skiffs, and various statements set forth in regard to the State of things. It was <reported> that the of had issued a warrant for his my apprehension—— and <that of> and that the Sheriff of , was expected down—— immediately. very strong evidence was also manifested that of was no acquainted with these proceedings. That had made oath before a Justice of the Peace or a Judge, and that the Judge had made the requisition, and not . also that the Writ issued by was illegal and unjustifiable. It is absolutely certain that the whole business is—— another <glaring> <instance> of the effects of prejudice <against me as a religious teacher> and that it proceeds from a persecuting Spirit, the parties having signified their determination to have me taken to whether by legal or illegal means. It was finally concluded that I should be taken up the in a skiff and be landed below Wiggin’s farm, so called, and that I should proceed from thence to brother ’s and there abide for a season. This being concluded upon we separated, myself and being rowed up the by and the remainder crossed over to . It was agreed that brother should proceed up the in shore unto the place where the Skiff should stop, and there light up two fires as a signal for a stopping place. After the Boat had proceeded some distance above the , a fire was discovered on shore. We concluded that it was the Signal, and immediately rowed towards shore. When near the shore one of the company [p. 1364]
August 8 of no force of effect, and the Prisoner or Prisoners shall be released and discharged therefrom
Sec 3. And be it also further ordained, that in the absence, sickness, debility, or other—— circumstances disqualifying or preventing the Mayor from officiating in his office, as Chief Justice of the Municipal Court, the Alderman present shall appoint one from—— amongst them to act as Chief Justice, or president pro tempore.
Sec. 4. This ordinance to take effect and be in force from and after its passage. Passed August 8. 1842. Vice Mayor and President pro tempore— Recorder—
A disgraceful and bloody riot occurred at this evening, in and about the “Sans Souci House.”
9 August 1842 • Tuesday
9 Tuesday 9. In company with and , preparing for the return of the Sheriff; prepared a Writ of Habeas Corpus from the Master in Chancery.
10 August 1842 • Wednesday
10 Wednesday 10. The Deputy Sheriff returned to , but I was absent, and he did not see me, or . He endeavored to alarm my , and the brethren with his threats, if I was not forthcoming, but they understood the law in such cases and his threats proved harmless.
11 August 1842 • Thursday
11 Thursday 11. This forenoon Brother entered into conversation with , upon the illegality of the whole proceedings in reference to the arrest. when the acknowledged that he believed Joseph was innocent and that ’s course which he had pursued was unjustifiable and illegal. I spent the day at Uncle ’s in and sent word that I wished to see —— , brothers , and others, with instructions to meet me on the between and . After dark, , , , , , and met at the Water side near the and proceeded in a Skiff between the , until they arrived near the lower end; and then hailed to shore. after waiting a very little while the skiff arrived from the opposite shore, and in it were myself and brother . A council was then held in the Skiffs, and various statements set forth in regard to the State of things. It was reported that the of had issued a warrant for my apprehension—— and that of and that the Sheriff of , was expected down—— immediately. very strong evidence was also manifested that of was no acquainted with these proceedings. That had made oath before a Justice of the Peace or a Judge, and that the Judge had made the requisition, and not . also that the Writ issued by was illegal and unjustifiable. It is absolutely certain that the whole business is—— another glaring instance of the effects of prejudice against me as a religious teacher and that it proceeds from a persecuting Spirit, the parties having signified their determination to have me taken to whether by legal or illegal means. It was finally concluded that I should be taken up the in a skiff and be landed below Wiggin’s farm, so called, and that I should proceed from thence to brother ’s and there abide for a season. This being concluded upon we separated, myself and being rowed up the by and the remainder crossed over to . It was agreed that brother should proceed up the in shore unto the place where the Skiff should stop, and there light up two fires as a signal for a stopping place. After the Boat had proceeded some distance above the , a fire was discovered on shore. We concluded that it was the Signal, and immediately rowed towards shore. When near the shore one of the company [p. 1364]
Page 1364