History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1369
image
<August 15> with who informed him that he had ascertained, that the Sheriffs were determined to have me and if they could not succeed themselves they would bring a force sufficient to search every house in the , and if they could not find me there they would search the &c As before stated the Sheriffs left the about four—— o’clock saying they were going to but did not meet them on the road— It is believed they are gone to . In consequence of these reports it was considered wisdom that some of the brethren should go and inform me accordingly about 9 o’clock , , , , , , and started by different routes on foot and came to the place where I was— when the statement was made to me I proposed to leave the , expecting I was no longer safe, but upon hearing the whole statement from those present, I said I should not leave my present retreat yet, I did not think I was discovered, neither did I think I was any more unsafe than before. I discovered a degree of excitement and agitation manifest in those who brought the report and I took occasion to gently reprove all present for letting report excite them, and advised them not to suffer themselves to be wrought upon by any report, but to maintain an even, undaunted mind— each one began to gather courage, and all fears were soon subsided, and the greatest union and good felling prevailed amongst all present— Various subjects then were conversed upon, and Counsel given, which was felt to be both seasonable and salutary, after conversing a while in the grove the company retired into the house, and sat and conversed until about 2 o’clock, at which time they departed evidently satisfied and much encouraged by the interview.
<Issued the following editorial> -[See Times and Seasons page 886 &c on persecution]-,
<A great whirlwind at Chauffailes— France—— Thirty houses were carried away— over 20 persons killed— Six hundred houses, with all they contained burned at Nowa Ussel in Russia. >
16 August 1842 • Tuesday
<16> Tuesday 16. Wrote as follows
August 16. 1842— My Dear I embrace this opportunity to express to you some of my feelings this morning. First of all I take the liberty to tender you my sincere thanks for the two interesting and consoling visits that you have made me during my almost exiled situation. Tongue cannot express the gratitude of my heart, for the warm and true hearted friendship you have manifested in these things toward me. The time has passed away since you left me, very agreeable, thus far; my mind being perfectly reconciled to my fate, let it be what it may. I have been kept from melancholy and dumps, by the kind heartedness of , and his interesting chit-chat from time—— to time, which has called my mind from the more strong contemplation of things, and subjects, that would have preyed more earnestly upon my feelings. Last night, brother , , and others came to see us. They seemed much agitated, and expressed some fears in consequence of some manoeuvreings and some flying reports which they had heard in relation to our safety; but after relating what it was, I was able to comprehend the whole matter to my entire satisfaction, and did not feel at all alarmed or uneasy. They think however, that the Militia will be called out to search the , and if this should be the case I would be much safer for the time being at a little distance off, until could get weary and be made ashamed of his corrupt and unhallowed proceedings. I had supposed, however, that if there were any serious operations taken by the , that or would have notified us; and cannot believe that any thing [p. 1369]
August 15 with who informed him that he had ascertained, that the Sheriffs were determined to have me and if they could not succeed themselves they would bring a force sufficient to search every house in the , and if they could not find me there they would search the &c As before stated the Sheriffs left the about four—— o’clock saying they were going to but did not meet them on the road— It is believed they are gone to . In consequence of these reports it was considered wisdom that some of the brethren should go and inform me accordingly about 9 o’clock , , , , , , and started by different routes on foot and came to the place where I was— when the statement was made to me I proposed to leave the , expecting I was no longer safe, but upon hearing the whole statement from those present, I said I should not leave my present retreat yet, I did not think I was discovered, neither did I think I was any more unsafe than before. I discovered a degree of excitement and agitation manifest in those who brought the report and I took occasion to gently reprove all present for letting report excite them, and advised them not to suffer themselves to be wrought upon by any report, but to maintain an even, undaunted mind— each one began to gather courage, and all fears were soon subsided, and the greatest union and good felling prevailed amongst all present— Various subjects then were conversed upon, and Counsel given, which was felt to be both seasonable and salutary, after conversing a while in the grove the company retired into the house, and sat and conversed until about 2 o’clock, at which time they departed evidently satisfied and much encouraged by the interview.
Issued the following editorial -[See Times and Seasons page 886 &c on persecution]-,
A great whirlwind at Chauffailes— France—— Thirty houses were carried away— over 20 persons killed— Six hundred houses, with all they contained burned at Nowa Ussel in Russia.
16 August 1842 • Tuesday
16 Tuesday 16. Wrote as follows
August 16. 1842— My Dear — I embrace this opportunity to express to you some of my feelings this morning. First of all I take the liberty to tender you my sincere thanks for the two interesting and consoling visits that you have made me during my almost exiled situation. Tongue cannot express the gratitude of my heart, for the warm and true hearted friendship you have manifested in these things toward me. The time has passed away since you left me, very agreeable, thus far; my mind being perfectly reconciled to my fate, let it be what it may. I have been kept from melancholy and dumps, by the kind heartedness of , and his interesting chit-chat from time—— to time, which has called my mind from the more strong contemplation of things, and subjects, that would have preyed more earnestly upon my feelings. Last night, brother , , and others came to see us. They seemed much agitated, and expressed some fears in consequence of some manoeuvreings and some flying reports which they had heard in relation to our safety; but after relating what it was, I was able to comprehend the whole matter to my entire satisfaction, and did not feel at all alarmed or uneasy. They think however, that the Militia will be called out to search the , and if this should be the case I would be much safer for the time being at a little distance off, until could get weary and be made ashamed of his corrupt and unhallowed proceedings. I had supposed, however, that if there were any serious operations taken by the , that or would have notified us; and cannot believe that any thing [p. 1369]
Page 1369